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Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Rose Hill Manor

Union Artillery Reserve

 
 
Rose Hill Manor Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
1. Rose Hill Manor Marker
Inscription.  
You are on the grounds of Rose Hill Manor, the final home of Maryland's first governor, Thomas Johnson. During its stay near Frederick, the Army of the Potomac's large Artillery Reserve occupied these grounds. Created after the Battle of Chancellorsville, Va., in early May 1863, and commanded by Brig. Gen. Robert O. Tyler, the Artillery Reserve was an independent grouping of batteries that could be rushed to reinforce or replace divisional batteries during battle or to strengthen threatened portions of the army's line. The reserve's wagons also carried extra artillery ammunition.

Some 19 batteries including 110 cannons and hundreds of attendant vehicles made up the Artillery Reserve during the Gettysburg Campaign. At full strength, a single battery used 100 horses, so the reserve's batteries alone required nearly 2,000 animals, and dozens more were needed to pull its wagons. On June 30, 2,745 men were present for duty with the Artillery Reserve. Such a large organization would have occupied much of the ground before you - and left behind a huge mess.

During the Battle of Gettysburg, Artillery Reserve ammunition wagons issued
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19,189 rounds to its own batteries as well as to others in the army. The reserve took part in slowing and repulsing the Confederate attacks on July 2 and blasting Gen. James Longstreet's frontal attack (later misnamed Pickett's Charge) on July 3.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails series list. A significant historical date for this entry is May 7, 1863.
 
Location. 39° 26.154′ N, 77° 24.33′ W. Marker is in Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker can be reached from North Market Street (State Highway 355), on the right when traveling south. Located in front of the manor house, in Rose Hill Manor Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1611 North Market Street, Frederick MD 21701, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Rose Hill Manor (within shouting distance of this marker); They Lie Here, Beneath Our Feet (approx. one mile away); Laboring Sons Memorial Ground (approx. 1.1 miles away); Rediscovered Past (approx. 1.1 miles away); Frederick's Boys High School (approx. 1.1 miles away); Roger Brooke Taney (approx. 1.2 miles away); Veterans Memorial (approx. 1.2 miles away); John McElroy, S.J. (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
Marker at the Entrance to Rose Hill Manor image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
2. Marker at the Entrance to Rose Hill Manor
The open fields beyond the marker were used by the Artillery Reserve to picket horses and park the various vehicles and cannon.
sectionhead>More about this marker. On the lower left is a photograph of "Rose Hill Manor, pictured during the 19th century, was the last house of Maryland's first elected governor, Thomas Johnson."

A portrait of Brig. Gen. Robert O. Tyler is next to a Gettysburg Campaign map illustrating the Federal army movements.
 
Also see . . .
1. Rose Hill Manor Park & Museum. Visit Frederick website entry (Submitted on October 6, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Rose Hill Manor. The Journey Through Hallowed Ground website entry (Submitted on October 6, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Army of the Potomac Artillery, Gettysburg Campaign. Stone Sentinels website entry:
As a measure of how large the Artillery Reserve component was, a full five brigades of artillery were consolidated within the organization. That was roughly a third of the total artillery within the Army of the Potomac. (Submitted on October 6, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional keywords. Gettysburg Campaign
 
Rose Hill Manor Today image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
3. Rose Hill Manor Today
Manor Grounds image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
4. Manor Grounds
Had one been at this spot during the stay of the Reserve Artillery, the field would have been filled with horses, wagons, cannon, men, and various implements of supporting the column.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 12, 2022. It was originally submitted on October 6, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 3,272 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 6, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

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Feb. 24, 2024