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Wye Mills in Talbot County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Wye Grist Mill and Museum

 
 
Wye Grist Mill and Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, October 22, 2007
1. Wye Grist Mill and Museum Marker
Inscription.  Out of hundreds of mills on the East Coast in colonial times, only a few survive, and fewer still operate. As the oldest working mill in Maryland (1682), the flour producing “grist” mill in front of you has participated in three centuries of war, nation-building, industrial invention and agricultural heritage. During the American Revolution, the Wye Grist Mill and hundreds of others like it on the Eastern Shore shipped barrels of flour via the Chesapeake Bay to the Continental Army, commanded by General George Washington. Historians dubbed the Eastern Shore “the Breadbasket of the American Revolution.”

Prominent past owners of the mill include Richard Bennett III, Edward Lloyd III and IV (owners of Wye House) and Colonel William Hemsley, Commander of the Queen Anne’s County militia and provisioner to the Continental Army, 1779-1783. Oliver Evans, “father of the modern factory” and first great American inventor, used the Wye Grist Mill in the 1790's to formulate automation ideas that revolutionized American factories.

The Friends of Wye Mill, a local visitor-supported charity, not part
Wye Grist Mill and Museum image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, October 22, 2007
2. Wye Grist Mill and Museum
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of any government, lovingly preserves and operates this mill, grinding flour to this day using two massive grindstones powered by a 26 horsepower overshot waterwheel. The Mill is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. “Millers” sell flour and offer tours April - November 10:00a.m. to 1:00 p.m., Monday - Thursday; 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Friday - Sunday; and demonstrate flour grinding every 1st and 3rd Saturday of the month. The mill is closed November - April.

Please help us keep the mill running: Friends of Wye Mill, P.O. Box 277, Wye Mills, MD 21679.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraIndustry & CommerceNotable EventsWar, US Revolutionary. A significant historical month for this entry is November 1918.
 
Location. 38° 56.514′ N, 76° 4.863′ W. Marker is in Wye Mills, Maryland, in Talbot County. Marker is on Wye Mills Road (Maryland Route 662) 0.1 miles south of Maryland Route 213, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 900 Wye Mills Road, Wye Mills MD 21679, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Wye Grist Mill (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Wye Grist Mill (within shouting distance of this marker); A Brief History of the Mill (within shouting distance of this marker);
Marker on Grist Mill wall image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, October 22, 2007
3. Marker on Grist Mill wall
The Wye Grist Mill Circa 1682 The Wye Grist Mill, one of Maryland's oldest commercial buildings, has operated almost continuously grinding Eastern Shore grains. Placed in 2000 by John Waller Chapter (Maryland) National Society, Colonial Dames XVII Century
So, How Does a Mill Work? (within shouting distance of this marker); The “Little House” in the Shade (approx. 0.2 miles away); Wye Oak House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Wye Oak (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Wye Oak (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wye Mills.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 19, 2019. It was originally submitted on October 26, 2007, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,705 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 26, 2007, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.

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Nov. 29, 2021