Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Dublin Township in Fulton County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Burnt Cabins

 
 
Burnt Cabins Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 9, 2009
1. Burnt Cabins Marker
Inscription.  
To pacify Indians Cabins
of intruding white settlers
burned here 1750
by order of the provincial
government

 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1750.
 
Location. 40° 4.756′ N, 77° 53.762′ W. Marker is in Dublin Township, Pennsylvania, in Fulton County. Marker is on Great Cove Road (Pennsylvania Route 522), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Burnt Cabins PA 17215, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Forbes Road (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named Burnt Cabins (approx. 0.4 miles away); Fort Lyttelton (approx. 3.6 miles away); Fort Littleton (approx. 3.6 miles away); Grand Army of the Republic Picnic (approx. 7.4 miles away); a different marker also named Grand Army of the Republic Picnic (approx. 7.4 miles away); Veterans Memorial (approx. 7.4 miles away); "Shadow of Death" (approx. 7.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dublin Township.
 
Regarding Burnt Cabins.
Burnt Cabins Marker Beside Highway 522 image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 9, 2009
2. Burnt Cabins Marker Beside Highway 522
Click or scan to see
this page online
Burnt Cabins is an unincorporated community in Dublin Township, Fulton County, Pennsylvania, United States, at the foot of Tuscarora Mountain. It contains U.S. Route 522 and I-76 (Pennsylvania Turnpike).

By 1750, the town had grown to 11 squatters cabins and was known as Sidneyville. The homes of these early settlers were burned by order of the provincial government, after Indians complained against white encroachment on their land. Participants in the burning included Conrad Weiser, Richard Peters, George Croghan, and Benjamin Chambers. The village's development was most influenced by the construction of the Burnt Cabins Grist Mill, which still produces flour and is on the National Register of Historic Places.
 
Also see . . .  The Keystone Marker Trust. (Submitted on June 29, 2010, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 20, 2022. It was originally submitted on June 29, 2010, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 1,151 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 29, 2010, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=32406

Paid Advertisements
 
 

May. 21, 2022