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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bulltown in Braxton County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

Bulltown / Bulltown Battle

 
 
Bulltown Marker image. Click for full size.
By R.& S. Conway, May 2010
1. Bulltown Marker
Inscription.  
Bulltown
Important point in plan of Washington to establish water transportation to West. Salt was made here as early as 1792. Attack of whites in 1772 upon Captain Bull's Indian village here was among the causes of Dunmore's War.

Bulltown Battle
On October 13, 1863, a force of 400 Union troops under Captain W. H. Mattingly, entrenched on the hills to the northeast, repulsed attack of Confederate forces under Colonel W. L. Jackson. Jackson retreated after some loss into Pocahontas County.
 
Erected 2002 by West Virginia Division of Archives and History.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: War, US CivilWars, US Indian. In addition, it is included in the West Virginia Archives and History series list. A significant historical month for this entry is October 1742.
 
Location. 38° 47.172′ N, 80° 33.909′ W. Marker is in Bulltown, West Virginia, in Braxton County. Marker is on Gauley Turnpike (State Road 4) (U.S. 19). Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Napier WV 26631, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured
Bulltown Battle Marker image. Click for full size.
By R.& S. Conway, May 2010
2. Bulltown Battle Marker
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as the crow flies. Battle of Bulltown (approx. half a mile away); Skirmish at Salt Lick Bridge (approx. 3 miles away); Lewis County / Braxton County (approx. 4˝ miles away); Fort Pickens (approx. 6 miles away); Burnsville Bridge (approx. 6.8 miles away); Fort Pickens / Engagements of Co. A (approx. 6.9 miles away); Town of Burnsville (approx. 7.3 miles away); Bennett-Camden (approx. 8 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Ohio History Central. Lord Dunmore's War, John Murray, Lord Dunmore, hoped to prevent Pennsylvania's expansion into modern-day West Virginia and Kentucky. He wished to place Virginia militiamen in these regions. He also hoped to open these lands to white settlement. (Submitted on October 18, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 8, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 18, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,198 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 18, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.

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Jul. 28, 2021