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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Spotsylvania Courthouse in Spotsylvania County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Chancellorsville Campaign

 
 
Chancellorsville Campaign Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 10, 2007
1. Chancellorsville Campaign Marker
Inscription.  May 2, 1863. Deluding the enemy was the secret of Jackson's success. Since his troops had been observed from Federal signal stations as they marched across the front of Hooker's army, he turned them south on the Brock Road to create the impression that he was in full retreat along the road to Spotsylvania Court House. Reaching a point where the head of his column was concealed from the Federals by dense forests, he turned sharply right, going north along this woodland trail which parallels the Brock Road, to complete his flanking movement.
 
Erected by United States Department of the Interior - National Park Service.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical date for this entry is May 2, 1864.
 
Location. 38° 15.801′ N, 77° 40.632′ W. Marker is near Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia, in Spotsylvania County. Marker is on Jackson Trail West, on the right when traveling west. Located on the Jackson Flank March driving loop in the Chancellorsville Battlefield section of the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Battlefield
Chancellorsville Campaign Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 10, 2007
2. Chancellorsville Campaign Marker
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Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 9934 Brock Rd, Spotsylvania VA 22553, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Chancellorsville Campaign (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named Chancellorsville Campaign (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named Chancellorsville Campaign (approx. 0.8 miles away); a different marker also named Chancellorsville Campaign (approx. 1.2 miles away); Lafayette at Corbin’s Bridge (approx. 1.2 miles away); Todd’s Tavern (approx. 1.2 miles away); a different marker also named Todd’s Tavern (approx. 1.2 miles away); a different marker also named Todd’s Tavern (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Spotsylvania Courthouse.
 
Regarding Chancellorsville Campaign. This is one of several markers for the Battle of Chancellorsville along the Jackson's Flank March and Attack trail. See the Jackson's Flank March and Attack Virtual Tour by Markers in the links section for a listing of related markers on the tour.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Chancellorsville. National Park Service site. (Submitted on December 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Jackson's Flank March and Attack Virtual Tour by Markers
Brock Road Intersection image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 10, 2007
3. Brock Road Intersection
Looking back from the marker location to the Brock Road. To the left, north, some five to six miles away were the main Federal defenses. Signal stations and sentries were posted and could observe some of Jackson's movement. However at the time, much as it is today, the dense woods and undergrowth prevented all but fleeting glimpses of the line of march.
. This virtual tour covers the optional Jackson Flank Trail route of the driving tour and concludes at Jackson's Flank Attack (stop 8) of the driving tour, tracing the route of Jackson's march to deliver the decisive attack of the battle. (Submitted on December 8, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 9, 2021. It was originally submitted on December 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 881 times since then and 11 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

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Dec. 9, 2021