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Downtown Washington in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“Damn the Torpedoes, Full Speed Ahead!”

Farragut Square, National Mall and Memorial Parks, Washington, D.C.

 

— National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —

 
“Damn the Torpedoes, Full Speed Ahead!” Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones
1. “Damn the Torpedoes, Full Speed Ahead!” Marker
Inscription.  
With these legendary words, naval officer David G. Farragut led the Union fleet past Confederate mines (then called torpedoes) and to victory at the Battle of Mobile Bay on August 5, 1864. From the rigging of his flagship, USS Hartford, Farragut directed the clash with the ironclad CSS Tennessee, as shown in this painting of the battle.

Earlier in the Civil War, Farragut gained national prominence by capturing New Orleans after a fierce battle with Confederate forts and ships. President Lincoln had assigned him command of the West Gulf Blockading Squadron. Lincoln believed Farragut was one of the best appointments he made during the war.

(Sidebar): Congress created three new naval ranks, including Full Admiral, especially for David G. Farragut. Admiral Farragut was the son of Jorge Farragut, a Spanish-born mariner and hero of the American Revolution.
 
Erected by
"Damn the Torpedoes, Full Speed Ahead!" Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
2. "Damn the Torpedoes, Full Speed Ahead!" Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: HeroesHispanic AmericansWar, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #16 Abraham Lincoln series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1864.
 
Location. 38° 54.112′ N, 77° 2.329′ W. Marker has been reported damaged. Marker is in Downtown Washington in Washington, District of Columbia. Marker is at the intersection of Connecticut Avenue Northwest and I Street Northwest, on the right when traveling south on Connecticut Avenue Northwest. Located in Farragut Square. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20006, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Admiral David G. Farragut (a few steps from this marker); Decatur House (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy (about 700 feet away); Baron von Steuben Memorial (about 700 feet away); Restoration of Jackson Place and Lafayette Square (approx. 0.2 miles away); Statler Hotel
“Damn the Torpedoes, Full Speed Ahead!” Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones
3. “Damn the Torpedoes, Full Speed Ahead!” Marker
(approx. 0.2 miles away); St. John's Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Nunziato DiPerna (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Downtown Washington.
 
More about this marker. The lower left-center is the famous painting of Farragut on the rigging of the Hartford during the Battle of Mobile Bay.

On the upper right is a portrait of Farragut listing the dates of his appointments - "David Glasgow Farragut 1801-1870. United States Navy's First * * Rear Admiral 1862, * * * Vice Admiral 1864, * * * * Full Admiral 1866."

On the lower right is a photo of "Vinnie Ream Hoxie, a young female sculptor, carefully researched the life of Farragut and produced Washington DC's first statue of a Civil War hero. The statue was dedicated on April 25, 1881, the nineteenth anniversary of Farragut's capture of New Orleans. The ten-foot figure and the four mortars were cast from the propeller of the Admiral's flagship, USS Hartford.
 
Also see . . .  Admiral Farragut Wikipedia Entry. (Submitted on December 10, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Farragut Square image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
4. Farragut Square
David Glasgow Farragut<br>1801-1870 image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, August 18, 2012
5. David Glasgow Farragut
1801-1870

United States Navy's First:
** Rear Admiral 1862
*** Vice Admiral 1864
**** Full Admiral 1866M
Close-up of photo on marker
An August Morning with Farragut <br> "Damn the Torpedoes, Full Speed Ahead" image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, August 18, 2012
6. An August Morning with Farragut
"Damn the Torpedoes, Full Speed Ahead"
This Painting by William H. Overend depicts the Admiral Farragut in the rigging of the USS Hartford at the battle of Mobile Bay.
Close-up of picture on the marker
Vinnie Ream Models Admiral Farragut image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, August 18, 2012
7. Vinnie Ream Models Admiral Farragut
Vinnie Ream Hoxie, a young female sculptor,carefully researched the life of Farragut and produced Washington D.C.'s first statue of a Civil War Hero. The statue was dedicated on April 25, 1881, the nineteenth anniversary of Farragut's capture of New Orleans. The Ten-foot figure and the four mortars were cast from the propeller of the Admiral's flagship, USS Hartford.
Close-up of photo on marker
Admiral Farragut Statue image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
8. Admiral Farragut Statue
Admiral David Farragut (1801–1870) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
9. Admiral David Farragut (1801–1870)
1881 bronze by Vinnie Ream (1847–1914) is approx 10 feet tall on a 16 foot base. “The sculpture, authorized by Congress on April 16, 1872, and four chopped mortars on the base were cast of bronze from the propeller of Admiral Farragut’s ship, the U.S.S. Hartford. ... The base is made of granite from Rockland, Maine. The base contains a box with documents relating to Farragut’s career, the history of the sculpture, a copy of the ‘Army and Navy Register,’ and a miniature bronze model of the propeller.” —from the Smithsonian Institution Research Information Service (SIRIS) database.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 12, 2022. It was originally submitted on December 10, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 3,180 times since then and 113 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 24, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   2. submitted on December 10, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on July 24, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   4. submitted on December 10, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5, 6, 7. submitted on May 5, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   8, 9. submitted on December 10, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

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Aug. 12, 2022