Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Watrous in Mora County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Fort Union National Monument / Santa Fe Trail

1851-1891

 
 
Fort Union National Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Kirchner, July 23, 2011
1. Fort Union National Monument Marker
Inscription.  

Fort Union National Monument 1851-1891
Once the largest post in the Southwest, Fort Union was established to control the Jicarilla Apaches and Utes, to protect the Santa Fe Trail, and to serve as a supply depot for other New Mexico forts. The arrival of the railroad and the pacification of the region led to its abandonment in 1891.

Santa Fe Trail
The difficulty of bringing caravans over rocky and mountainous Raton Pass kept most wagon traffic on the Cimarron Cutoff of the Santa Fe Trail until the 1840's. Afterwards, the Mountain Branch, which here approaches Raton Pass, became more popular with traders, immigrants, gold seekers, and government supply trains.
 
Erected by New Mexico Historic Preservation Division.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Forts and Castles. In addition, it is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the Santa Fe Trail series lists. A significant historical year for this entry is 1891.
 
Location. 35° 52.67′ N, 104° 51.545′ W. Marker
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
is near Watrous, New Mexico, in Mora County. Marker can be reached from Interstate 25 at milepost 375.5,, 8.6 miles north of State Road 161. The marker is in the southbound rest area. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Watrous NM 87753, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Santa Fe Trail (approx. 1.4 miles away); a different marker also named Santa Fe Trail (approx. 1.4 miles away); A Show of Strength (approx. 8.3 miles away); Tides of Change (approx. 8.3 miles away); Intersection of History (approx. 8.3 miles away); Lasting View (approx. 8.3 miles away); A New Community Sprouts Roots (approx. 8.3 miles away); From Indigenous Trail to International Highway (approx. 8.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Watrous.
 
Also see . . .  Loma Parda. Loma Parda was the closest town to Fort Union. This youtube video tells it's story through beautiful photography. (Submitted on November 28, 2011.) 
 
Santa Fe Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Kirchner, July 23, 2011
2. Santa Fe Trail Marker
Fort Union National Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Kirchner, July 23, 2011
3. Fort Union National Monument Marker
Santa Fe Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Kirchner, July 23, 2011
4. Santa Fe Trail Marker
Santa Fe Trail image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Kirchner
5. Santa Fe Trail
1822-1879
Marked by the
Daughters of the
American Revolution
and the
Territory of New Mexico
1910
Santa Fe Trail D.A.R Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Kirchner
6. Santa Fe Trail D.A.R Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 14, 2024. It was originally submitted on August 8, 2011, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 960 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on August 8, 2011, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   2. submitted on August 9, 2011, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   3. submitted on August 8, 2011, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   4. submitted on August 9, 2011, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   5, 6. submitted on August 8, 2011, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=45829

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Jun. 19, 2024