Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Crescent City in Putnam County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Asa Philip Randolph

 
 
Asa Philip Randolph Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Angela Sanchez Tischler, April 29, 2007
1. Asa Philip Randolph Marker
Inscription.  
Civic Rights Activist, Trade Union Leader, Crusader for Justice
1889–1979

“Salvation for a race, nation or class must come from within. Freedom is never granted; it is won. Justice is never given; it is exacted.”

Asa Philip Randolph was born in Crescent City, Florida on April 15, 1889 to Rev. James Williams and Elizabeth Robinson Randolph. His father was a minister at this church where Randolph attended as a youth. In 1925 he became the founder and president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and remained president until 1968. He founded a group that later became the League of Non Violent Civil Disobedience Against Military Segregation. He was the first president (1960–66) of the Negro American Labor Council. Randolph was the originator of two major marches on Washington. One was held in 1941; the other was the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, which brought more than 200,000 people to the capital on August 28, 1963. Two years later he formed the A. Philip Randolph Institute for community leaders to study the causes of poverty. He received the Presidential Medal of
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
Freedom from President Johnson in 1964. He died May 16, 1979 in New York City. In 1989 Randolph became the second Union President to be honored on a U. S. postage stamp. “No individual did more to help the poor, the disposed and the working class in the United States and around the world.”
 
Erected 2005 by The A. Philip Randolph Institute and the Florida Department of State. (Marker Number F-564.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansCivil RightsIndustry & CommerceRailroads & Streetcars. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #36 Lyndon B. Johnson series list. A significant historical month for this entry is April 1882.
 
Location. 29° 25.958′ N, 81° 30.739′ W. Marker is in Crescent City, Florida, in Putnam County. Marker is at the intersection of Eucaliptus Avenue and Cedar Street, on the right when traveling west on Eucaliptus Avenue. From US Hwy 17 travel west on Eucaliptus Ave. two blocks to Cedar St. Marker is located in front of a church. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 Cedar St, Crescent City FL 32112, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Florida's First Bicentennial Park (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Battle of Braddock’s Farm (approx. 2.2 miles
Asa Philip Randolph Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Angela Sanchez Tischler, April 27, 2007
2. Asa Philip Randolph Marker
away); The Mount Royal Site (approx. 8½ miles away); a different marker also named The Mount Royal Site (approx. 8½ miles away); Mount Royal (approx. 8.6 miles away); Alice Scott Abbott (approx. 12.3 miles away); Honoring All Veterans Monument (approx. 12.4 miles away); Historic Espanola Schoolhouse (approx. 13.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Crescent City.
 
More about this marker. It marks a Florida Heritage Landmark.
 
Also see . . .  A. Philip Randolph: And The African-American Labor Movement. Book by Calvin Craig Miller on Amazon.com. (Submitted on April 27, 2007.) This website may earn income if you use this link to make a purchase on Amazon.com. 
 
Union Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Angela Sanchez Tischler, April 29, 2007
3. Union Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church
Asa Philip Randolph image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, January 31, 2019
4. Asa Philip Randolph
This c. 1945 portrait of A. Philip Randolph by Ernest Hamlin Baker hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Civil rights activist A. Philip Randolph waged a lifelong battle for the economic empowerment of African Americans. In 1925, he accepted the challenge of organizing the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters -- the first black labor union chartered by the American Federation of Labor. Continuing his advocacy for African American workers, Randolph called for a march on Washington in 1941 to protest the exclusion of blacks from defense industry jobs. He canceled that march only after President Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945) signed an order mandating an end to discriminatory practices by government contractors.

Following World War II, Randolph led the effort to desegregate the nation’s armed forces and waged a civil disobedience campaign against the draft until President Harry Truman (1884-1972) ordered an end to segregation in the military in 1948. Randolph crowned his career in 1963 by helping to organize the celebrated March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.” – National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 3, 2019. It was originally submitted on April 27, 2007, by Angela Sanchez Tischler of Crescent City, Florida. This page has been viewed 5,468 times since then and 34 times this year. Last updated on February 18, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. Photos:   1. submitted on April 29, 2007, by Angela Sanchez Tischler of Crescent City, Florida.   2. submitted on April 27, 2007, by Angela Sanchez Tischler of Crescent City, Florida.   3. submitted on April 29, 2007, by Angela Sanchez Tischler of Crescent City, Florida.   4. submitted on March 3, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=5514

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Apr. 13, 2024