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Pickaway Township near Circleville in Pickaway County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Monument to Logan

 
 
Logan's Speech Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dale K. Benington, July 11, 2012
1. Logan's Speech Marker
Inscription.  
Logan’s Elm
Height of tree 104 Ft., Spread 154 Ft.,
Circumference of Body 23 Ft.


Logan’s Speech
“I appeal to any white man to say if ever he entered Logan’s cabin hungry and he gave him not meat; if ever he came cold and naked and he clothed him not. During the course of the last long and bloody war, Logan remained idle in his cabin, an advocate for peace. Such was my love for the whites that my countrymen pointed as they passed and said, ‘Logan is the friend of white men.’ I had even thought to live with you but for the injuries of one man. Colonel Cresap, the last spring in cold blood and unprovoked murdered all the relatives of Logan; not sparing even his women and children. There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it. I have killed many. I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country I rejoice at the beams of peace. Do not harbor the thought that mine is the joy of fear. Logan never felt fear. He will not turn on his heel to save his life. Who is there to mourn for Logan? Not One.”

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(Chief Logan’s likeness in bronze)
1774 – 1798
Beside the spring then flowing beneath this majestic elm of the centuries in 1774, Logan, the chief of the Mingoes and friend of the whites, here delivered his oration upon the occasion of the signing of the treaty of peace between the chiefs of the Northwestern Indian tribes and the Virginia Militia; a treaty following the Battle of Point Pleasant, West Virginia. An oration unequalled for eloquence, lofty sentiment, solemn truth and poignant sorrow. This treaty opened the Northwest Territory to settlement.

This tribute to Logan was erected in 1919 by the descendants of the pioneers of this community — a tribute from civilization to a noble man of a savage race.
 
Erected 1919 by the Descendants of the Pioneers of this Community.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Native AmericansWars, US Indian. A significant historical year for this entry is 1774.
 
Location. 39° 30.554′ N, 82° 57.333′ W. Marker is near Circleville, Ohio, in Pickaway County. It is in Pickaway Township. Marker can be reached from Ohio Route 361 near Wolfe Road (Ohio Route 361), on the right when traveling west. This historic marker is in Logan Elm State Memorial,
Logan's Speech Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dale K. Benington, July 11, 2012
2. Logan's Speech Marker
The actual site of "Logan's Elm" was just beyond the historic monument, on the down side of the slight rise beyond the monument.
one mile east of US Route 23, and about five miles south of Circleville. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 9 Route 361, Circleville OH 43113, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Chief Logan / Logan Elm (within shouting distance of this marker); Cornstalk (within shouting distance of this marker); Grenadier Squaw (Non-hel-e-ma) (within shouting distance of this marker); Among Those Present (within shouting distance of this marker); Capt. Michael Cresap (within shouting distance of this marker); John Boggs Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Logan Elm (within shouting distance of this marker); Grenadier Squaw Village / Cornstalk Town (approx. 1˝ miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Circleville.
 
Also see . . .  Logan (Iroquois leader). Excerpt:
Logan's friendly relations with white settlers changed after the Yellow Creek massacre of April 30, 1774. A group of Virginia Long Knives led by Daniel Greathouse murdered a number of Mingo, among them Logan's brother (commonly known as John Petty) and at least two other close female relatives, one of them pregnant and caring for an infant daughter. Her children's father was John Gibson, a prominent trader in the region. These Mingo had been living near the mouth of Yellow
Logan's Speech Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dale K. Benington, July 30, 2005
3. Logan's Speech Marker
Close-up view of the text and artwork on top front of the historic monument.
Creek, and had been lured to the cabin of Joshua Baker, a settler and rum trader who lived across the Ohio River from their village. The Mingo in Baker's cabin were all murdered, except for the infant mixed-race child, who was spared with the intention of giving her to her father. At least two canoes were dispatched from the Yellow Creek village to aid their members, but they were repelled by Greathouse's men concealed along the river. In all, approximately a dozen Mingo were murdered in the cabin and on the river. Logan was not present in the area when the massacre took place, and was summoned to return by runners.
(Submitted on May 6, 2023.) 
 
Logan's Speech Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dale K. Benington, July 30, 2005
4. Logan's Speech Marker
View of the text on the front side of the historic monument.
Logan's Speech Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dale K. Benington, July 30, 2005
5. Logan's Speech Marker
Close-up view of the text on the backside of the historic monument.
Logan Elm in 1912 image. Click for full size.
Photographer unknown (Public Domain) via the West Bend News, 1912
6. Logan Elm in 1912
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 12, 2023. It was originally submitted on September 18, 2012, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 915 times since then and 54 times this year. It was the Marker of the Week May 14, 2023. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on October 7, 2012, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   6. submitted on August 12, 2023, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.

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Apr. 15, 2024