Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richmond, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Oakwood Cemetery

Confederate Section

 
 
Oakwood Cemetery CWT Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, December 13, 2012
1. Oakwood Cemetery CWT Marker
Inscription.  Almost every Confederate soldier who died in a Richmond hospital during the war was buried in one of three local cemeteries: Hollywood, Oakwood, or Shockoe Hill. Although Hollywood Cemetery is the best known because of the many prominent men buried there, Oakwood’s Confederate section covers an equivalent area and contains the graves of more than 17,000 of the South’s fighting men.

Burials occurred here between August 1861 and April 1865. Most of the soldiers died in one of Richmond’s many hospitals. Those in the eastern end of the city, Chimborazo and Howard’s Grove, were two of the three busiest hospitals in Richmond. Chimborazo treated more patients than any other hospital in the world. More than 75 men a day were buried here in 1862 for several weeks after the Seven Day’s Battles.

No nationally famous men are interred here: no generals, only a handful of field officers, and a few hundred commissioned officers. More than 95 percent of those buried here were privates, making this a vast memorial to the “common soldier” of the Army of Northern Virginia. In 1862, a Richmond newspaper predicted that Oakwood “will
Oakwood Cemetery CWT Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, December 13, 2012
2. Oakwood Cemetery CWT Marker
Soldier's Monument in background
Click or scan to see
this page online
become the Mecca of all visitors …there is hardly any resident of the Confederate states who will not be able to recognize … one whom they have known in happier, if not better, days.”

(sidebar)
When Richmond's first municipal cemetery, Shockoe Hill, began to fill up in the 1850s, the city acquired 66 acres here in 1854. The first burials occurred in 1858. Today, Oakwood Cemetery encompasses 176 acres.

(sidebar)
On April 14, 1866, local women formed the “Ladles Memorial Association for the Confederate Dead in Oakwood Cemetery.” They held Richmond’s first Confederate memorial day commemoration here on May 10, 1866. Gen. Robert E. Lee declined their invitation to attend, but wrote that “the graves of the Confederate dead will always be green in my memory, and their deeds be hallowed in my recollection.” For decades, the association maintained the Confederate section, placed painted wooden headboards at each grave, erected a commemorative obelisk, and conducted well-attended annual exercises on Confederate Memorial Day. The Sons of Confederate Veterans has managed the Confederate section since 2009.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial Sites
Graves of Confederate soldiers in Oakwood Cemetery, with board markers. image. Click for full size.
By John Reekie
3. Graves of Confederate soldiers in Oakwood Cemetery, with board markers.
Library of Congress [LC-B815- 931]
War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Sons of Confederate Veterans/United Confederate Veterans, and the Virginia Civil War Trails series lists. A significant historical month for this entry is April 1865.
 
Location. 37° 32.045′ N, 77° 23.716′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Virginia. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Oakwood Avenue and East Richmond Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Richmond VA 23223, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Oakwood Cemetery Confederate Section (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Burying Ground – For Colored Paupers (approx. 0.4 miles away); Evergreen Cemetery (approx. 0.4 miles away); Nine Mile Road (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Dabb House (approx. 0.9 miles away); World War II Memorial (approx. 0.9 miles away); Dabbs House (approx. 0.9 miles away); 3420 East Broad Street (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond.
 
Soldiers' Monument (Oakwood Cemetery), Richmond, Va. image. Click for full size.
By Southern Bargain House, Richmond, Va.
4. Soldiers' Monument (Oakwood Cemetery), Richmond, Va.
Around this granite shaft is buried 16,000 Confederate Soldiers who fell at Malvern Hill and other battle fields adjacent to Richmond. The valor and devotion to the 'Lost Cause' of this silent army have been recorded on many a [pages] of deathless glory. VCU Libraries Digital Collections - Rarely Seen Richmond
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 31, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 14, 2012, by Bernard Fisher of Richmond, Virginia. This page has been viewed 752 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 14, 2012, by Bernard Fisher of Richmond, Virginia.   3. submitted on November 2, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Richmond, Virginia.   4. submitted on May 10, 2012, by Bernard Fisher of Richmond, Virginia.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=61820

Paid Advertisement
Sep. 22, 2021