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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Capitol Hill in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Sewall-Belmont House & Museum

 
 
The Sewall-Belmont House & Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 12, 2013
1. The Sewall-Belmont House & Museum Marker
Inscription.  
The Sewall-Belmont House & Museum, one of the oldest residential properties on Capitol Hill, has been the historic headquarters of the National Woman's Party since 1929. Named after Robert Sewall, the original owner of the site, and Alva Belmont, the president and benefactor of the National Woman's Party, this house has been at the center of political life in Washington for more than two hundred years. Today, the Sewall-Belmont House seeks to educate the public by sharing the inspiring story of century of courageous activism by American women.
 
Erected by National Woman's Party.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Civil RightsGovernment & PoliticsWomen.
 
Location. 38° 53.527′ N, 77° 0.234′ W. Marker is in Capitol Hill in Washington, District of Columbia. Marker is on Constitution Avenue Northeast (Alternate U.S. 1) west of 2nd Street Northeast, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 144 Constitution Avenue Northeast, Washington DC 20002, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers
The Sewall-Belmont House & Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 12, 2013
2. The Sewall-Belmont House & Museum Marker
are within walking distance of this marker. From June to December, 1917 (here, next to this marker); Residence of Albert Gallatin (a few steps from this marker); Alva Belmont House (a few steps from this marker); Fiery Destruction (within shouting distance of this marker); Torch of Freedom (within shouting distance of this marker); Cortelyou House (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Minuteman Memorial Building (about 600 feet away); The Old Brick Capitol (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Capitol Hill.
 
Also see . . .  Sewall-Belmont House. National Park Service entry (Submitted on January 13, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 
 
The Sewall-Belmont House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 12, 2013
3. The Sewall-Belmont House
Close-up of photo on marker
Members of the National Woman's Party image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 12, 2013
4. Members of the National Woman's Party
Close-up of photo on marker
Dedicating the Alva Belmont House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 12, 2013
5. Dedicating the Alva Belmont House
Close-up of photo on marker
The Sewall-Belmont House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 12, 2013
6. The Sewall-Belmont House
144 Constitution Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 12, 2013
7. 144 Constitution Avenue
Stained glass fanlight from the inside.
National Woman's Party<br>founded 1913 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 12, 2013
8. National Woman's Party
founded 1913
National Register of Historic Places plaque image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, April 10, 2018
9. National Register of Historic Places plaque
The House is now the Belmont - Paul Women's Equality National Monument image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, April 10, 2018
10. The House is now the Belmont - Paul Women's Equality National Monument
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 13, 2021. It was originally submitted on December 28, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 615 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on December 28, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   9, 10. submitted on April 10, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Jan. 21, 2021