Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Birmingham in Jefferson County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Police Presence

March Route to Government

 

— Birmingham Civil Rights Heritage Trail —

 
Police Presence Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, December 5, 2021
1. Police Presence Marker
Inscription.  Birmingham Blacks had no love for police, who often harassed and brutalized them rather than protect them from bombings and violence. Some policemen were suspected Ku Klux Klan members or sympathizers. Public Safety Commissioner Eugene “Bull” Connor sent police officers to spy on mass meetings at civil rights churches. "Project C" organizers counted on "Bull” and his police to brutally enforce segregation laws. "Project C” (C for “Confrontation") was a series of non-violent actions that included marches, boycotts, sit-ins and mass jailings-often done with prayer and freedom songs. Organizers believed images of non- violent protestors confronting police would spark moral outrage and support for their cause.

Paired marker
May 1963
Helmeted police stand ready in Kelly Ingram Park outside the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, one of many strategic hubs from which "Project C" organizers launched marches. Police try to keep marchers away from City Hall, usually stopping them at 17th Street. White police often considered this street to be the great dividing line between them and Black protesters advancing to government
Police Presence Marker (paired marker). image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton
2. Police Presence Marker (paired marker).
Click or scan to see
this page online
sites downtown.

"No man can make us hate, and no man can make us afraid."
Rev. Fred L. Shuttlesworth
In his "New Negro Church" speech, May 17, 1957

Lesson A2: Find other examples of segregation laws and study their impact on people.
 
Erected by the Birmingham Civil Rights Heritage Trail. (Marker Number A2.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansCivil Rights. In addition, it is included in the Birmingham Civil Rights Heritage Trail series list. A significant historical month for this entry is May 1963.
 
Location. 33° 31.008′ N, 86° 48.835′ W. Marker is in Birmingham, Alabama, in Jefferson County. Marker is on 6th Avenue North west of 17th Street North. Located on north side of Kelly Ingram Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Birmingham AL 35203, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Water Cannons (within shouting distance of this marker); Bishop Calvin Wallace Woods, Sr. (within shouting distance of this marker); Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (within shouting distance of this marker); Birmingham Civil Rights Institute (within shouting distance of this marker); Jim Crow on the Books (within shouting distance of this marker); a different
Police Presence Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, December 5, 2021
3. Police Presence Marker
marker also named Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (within shouting distance of this marker); Don't Tread on Me (within shouting distance of this marker); Reflecting Pool (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Birmingham.
 
Regarding Police Presence. The Civil Rights Activist Committee “Home of the Foot Soldiers“ is the Information Center for the Birmingham Civil Rights Heritage Trail.
 
Police Presence Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Pfingsten, April 5, 2014
4. Police Presence Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 8, 2022. It was originally submitted on April 16, 2014, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 575 times since then and 17 times this year. Last updated on April 16, 2014, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 5, 2021, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.   4. submitted on April 16, 2014, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=73032

Paid Advertisements
 
 

May. 22, 2022