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Birmingham in Jefferson County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Jim Crow on the Books

March Route to Government

 

— Birmingham Civil Rights Heritage Trail —

 
Jim Crow on the Books Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, December 5, 2021
1. Jim Crow on the Books Marker
Inscription.  The first march to City Hall was organized in 1955 by Rev. Fred L. Shuttlesworth when he petitioned the city to hire Negro policemen. By 1963, thousands of Blacks marched on City Hall to protest Jim Crow laws that were a constant reminder of Blacks' second-class status in America. Such laws robbed them of fair voting, and public facility rights. Separate water fountains, restrooms, schools, public transportation and other facilities were marked with "Whites Only" and "Colored" or "Negroes" signs. Separate did not mean equal; facilities for Blacks were substandard to ones for Whites. When Supreme Court rulings in the 1950s began reversing the legal basis for Jim Crow nationally, Blacks in Birmingham and throughout the American South began to disobey segregation laws, demanding that the laws be repealed.

Paired marker
May 1963
Birmingham, Alabama, was considered America's most segregated city. Both city and state governments created legal codes that strictly banned nearly all social contact between Blacks and Whites. City Code Section 597 said: “It shall be unlawful for a Negro and a white person to play together
Jim Crow on the Books Marker (paired). image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, December 5, 2021
2. Jim Crow on the Books Marker (paired).
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or in company with each other in any game of cards, dice, dominoes and checkers.” On September 19, 1950, the city later passed Ordinance 798-F to add even more restrictions to prevent racial interaction at baseball, softball, football, basketball, or similar games.

"Ain't gonna let nobody turn me round was not just a song. It was a resolve."
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
In his book, Why We Can't Wait, 1964

Lesson A1: Learn about the Jim Crow laws used in the U.S. before 1963. How have things changed.
 
Erected by the Birmingham Civil Rights Heritage Trail. (Marker Number A1.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansCivil Rights. In addition, it is included in the Birmingham Civil Rights Heritage Trail series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1955.
 
Location. 33° 30.994′ N, 86° 48.86′ W. Marker is in Birmingham, Alabama, in Jefferson County. Marker is at the intersection of 6th Avenue North and 16th Street North on 6th Avenue North. Located at NW corner of Kelly Ingram Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 500 17th St N, Birmingham AL 35203, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Birmingham Civil Rights Institute (here, next to this marker); Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Jim Crow on the Books Marker along with paired marker. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, December 5, 2021
3. Jim Crow on the Books Marker along with paired marker.
(a few steps from this marker); Don't Tread on Me (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (a few steps from this marker); Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth (within shouting distance of this marker); Police Presence (within shouting distance of this marker); Sixteenth Street Baptist Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Sixteenth Street Baptist Church and Parsonage (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Birmingham.
 
Regarding Jim Crow on the Books. The Civil Rights Activist Committee “Home of the Foot Soldiers“ is the Information Center for the Birmingham Civil Rights Heritage Trail.
 
Jim Crow on the Books Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Pfingsten, April 5, 2014
4. Jim Crow on the Books Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 8, 2022. It was originally submitted on April 16, 2014, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 646 times since then and 36 times this year. Last updated on April 16, 2014, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 5, 2021, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.   4. submitted on April 16, 2014, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.

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Jun. 25, 2022