Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Atlanta in DeKalb County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Death of McPherson

 
 
Death of McPherson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Felch Dumas, July 1, 2008
1. Death of McPherson Marker
Inscription.  

The monument in the enclosure was erected by U.S. Army Engineers to mark the site where Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson was killed during the Battle of Atlanta, July 22, 1864.

McPherson rode S. from the Ga. R.R. when he heard firing in Sugar Cr. valley, where the rear attack by Walker's & Bate's divs. (CS) fell upon Dodge's 16th A.C. After pausing to observe this part of the battle, he galloped towards the left of the 17th A.C. (Flat Shoals & Glenwood), on a road through the pines. At this point he was assailed by skirmishers of Cleburne's Div.; (CS) refusing to surrender he was shot while attempting to escape.
 
Erected 1956 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 044-45.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Georgia Historical Society series list. A significant historical date for this entry is July 22, 1864.
 
Location. 33° 44.648′ N, 84° 20.478′ W. Marker is in Atlanta, Georgia, in DeKalb County. Marker is at the intersection of McPherson Avenue and Monument
Death of McPherson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Felch Dumas, July 1, 2008
2. Death of McPherson Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
Avenue SE, on the left when traveling west on McPherson Avenue. The marker is located in Monument Park at the intersection of McPherson and Monument Avenues, along with a cannon denoting the death of a general. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Atlanta GA 30316, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Historic Ground --1864 (here, next to this marker); Cleburne's Div. in the Federal Rear (approx. 0.2 miles away); Gresham's Division (approx. ¼ mile away); McPherson's Last Ride (approx. ¼ mile away); Cleburne Outflanked Left Wing, 17th A.C. (approx. 0.3 miles away); Mersy’s Brigade (approx. 0.4 miles away); Wheeler's Cav. Intrenched (approx. half a mile away); Leggett's Hill (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Atlanta.
 
Regarding Death of McPherson. The route taken by McPherson from the McPherson's Last Ride Marker is bisected by Interstate 20 and can no longer be retraced.
 
Also see . . .  James B. McPherson. Wikipedia biography (Submitted on January 8, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 
 
Death of McPherson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Dover, December 31, 2010
3. Death of McPherson Marker
McPherson's Cannon Monument image. Click for full size.
By Felch Dumas, July 1, 2008
4. McPherson's Cannon Monument
Monument Park image. Click for full size.
By Felch Dumas, July 1, 2008
5. Monument Park
View of Monument Park towards Leggett's Hill
<i>Spot in woods where Gen. James B. McPherson was killed, July 22, 1864</i> image. Click for full size.
By George N. Barnard, 1864
6. Spot in woods where Gen. James B. McPherson was killed, July 22, 1864
From the right half of a stereograph pair, from the Civil War glass negative collection (Library of Congress).

The spot where McPherson was killed was marked almost immediately - nailed to the tree hangs a wooden sign reading "Maj. Gen. J. B. McPherson, July 22, 1864", while also carved into the same tree below the sign is his name and date of death. (This is easier to read in the 23 MB online archival version, rather than the 390k version here.) Note also the detritus of war visible here: horse bones, the remains of a wagon or gun carriage, cannon balls, and clothing bits.
James Birdseye McPherson (1828–1864) image. Click for full size.
Matthew Brady via Wikipedia, unknown
7. James Birdseye McPherson (1828–1864)
A Major General in the Union Army during the American Civil War, he was killed at the Battle of Atlanta, the second highest ranking Union officer killed during the war.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 8, 2021. It was originally submitted on July 2, 2008, by Felch Dumas of Decatur, Georgia. This page has been viewed 4,946 times since then and 140 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 2, 2008, by Felch Dumas of Decatur, Georgia.   3. submitted on January 1, 2011, by Michael Dover of Ellerslie, Georgia.   4, 5. submitted on July 2, 2008, by Felch Dumas of Decatur, Georgia.   6. submitted on August 22, 2015.   7. submitted on January 8, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=8736

Paid Advertisement
Sep. 20, 2021