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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Elmira in Chemung County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John W. Jones Museum

 
 
John W. Jones Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, September 20, 2015
1. John W. Jones Museum Marker
Inscription.  John W. Jones (1817-1900) was the courageous stationmaster of the Underground Railroad in Elmira. Escaping from slavery in Virginia, he made the dangerous 300-mile journey to freedom on the Underground Railroad and arrived in Elmira in 1844. Working with local abolitionists, Jones guided over 800 freedom seekers on their way to the Canadian border. He managed this feat by befriending local train conductors and baggage handlers and guaranteeing their assistance. They used the 4 a.m. train so often it became known as the Freedom Baggage Car.

Jones was a man of great character and compassion. As sexton of the Woodlawn Cemetery, he supervised the burial of nearly 3,000 Confederate soldiers who died in the Elmira Prison Camp during the Civil War. Ironically, he buried with dignity the men who had fought to keep him enslaved, carefully recording their personal information. Woodlawn National Cemetery was created from his accurate burial records.
 
Erected by Underground Railroad Heritage Trail.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Abolition & Underground RR
John W. Jones Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Scott J. Payne, April 9, 2022
2. John W. Jones Museum Marker
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African AmericansCemeteries & Burial Sites. A significant historical year for this entry is 1844.
 
Location. 42° 6.465′ N, 76° 49.467′ W. Marker is in Elmira, New York, in Chemung County. Marker is at the intersection of Davis Street and Woodlawn Avenue, on the right on Davis Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1250 David Street, Elmira NY 14901, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John W. Jones (a few steps from this marker); Augustus W. Cowles (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Mark Twain (about 600 feet away); Colonel John Hendy (about 800 feet away); Confederate Burials in the National Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away); Confederate Burials (approx. 0.2 miles away); Shohola Railroad Accident Memorial (approx. ¼ mile away); Confederate Soldiers Memorial (approx. ¼ mile away); Underground Railroad Participants (approx. ¼ mile away); Woodlawn National Cemetery (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Elmira.
 
Also see . . .
1. John W. Jones Museum. (Submitted on November 2, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
2. John W. Jones House. The John W. Jones House currently stands at 1250 Davis Street, Elmira, New York, across from a historic
John W. Jones Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, September 20, 2015
3. John W. Jones Museum Marker
entrance to Woodlawn Cemetery. It is the former home of John W. Jones and current home of the John W. Jones Museum. (Submitted on November 2, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. John W. Jones. John W. Jones was born on June 21, 1817, on a plantation in Leesburg, Virginia, as a slave to the Ellzey family. Jones died on December 26, 1900 and is buried in Woodlawn National Cemetery, not far from Mark Twain. He was married to Rachel Jones (née Swails) in 1856, with whom he had three sons and one daughter. On June 3, 1844, fearing he would be sold to another plantation, as his owner grew old and near death, Jones and four others fled north. They survived a 300-mile trip and arrived in Elmira, New York in July 1844. (Submitted on November 2, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Underground Railroad. The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses used by 19th-century enslaved people of African descent in the United States in efforts to escape to free states and Canada with the aid of abolitionists and allies who were sympathetic to their cause. (Submitted on November 2, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
John W. Jones Museum Sign image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, September 20, 2015
4. John W. Jones Museum Sign
John W. Jones Museum and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, September 20, 2015
5. John W. Jones Museum and Marker
John W. Jones Museum and Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, September 20, 2015
6. John W. Jones Museum and Marker
John W. Jones (1817-1900) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott
7. John W. Jones (1817-1900)
John W. Jones Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, September 20, 2015
8. John W. Jones Museum Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 17, 2022. It was originally submitted on November 2, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 358 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on November 2, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   2. submitted on April 9, 2022, by Scott J. Payne of Deposit, New York.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on November 2, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

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Jul. 3, 2022