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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Montgomery in Montgomery County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Birth of Montgomery Bus Boycott

Boycott planned & publicized here at ASU's Councill Hall

 
 
Birth of Montgomery Bus Boycott Marker (Front) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, December 5, 2015
1. Birth of Montgomery Bus Boycott Marker (Front)
Inscription.  
Side 1
On Dec. 1, 1955, at Alabama State College (now Alabama State University) in a basement room in Councill Hall, the Montgomery Bus Boycott was planned and publicized after the arrest that day of Rosa Parks, who refused to give up her seat to a white person on a segregated city bus.

Following Parks' arrest, Alabama State College took action. Jo Ann Robinson, a faculty member, authored the text of a flyer calling for blacks to boycott segregated city buses and, joined by others, responded to Parks' arrest by mimeographing thousand of flyers here calling for a one-day boycott of the buses to start the following Monday, Dec. 5. Assisted by members of the Women's Political Council (WPC), they distributed them throughout the city's black community in hopes of ending segregation on city buses.
(Continued on other side)

Side 2
(Continued from other side)

Robinson was perhaps the person most instrumental in planning and publicizing the 1955 Boycott, proposing the idea to the WPC more than a year before it was implemented. She was assisted by WPC members who included Thelma
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Glass, Irene West, Mary Fair Burks & others; and advised by activist E.D. Nixon & attorney Fred Gray (ASU alumnus '51) who was also eager to challenge the segregated bus law. Because of the spark that was lit here, news of the planned protest received widespread publicity & on Dec. 5, the Boycott was successful with over 90% of the city's black citizens staying off the buses. The city's black leaders extended the Boycott into a long-term campaign that lasted from Dec. 5, 1955 to Dec. 20, 1956, with widespread black support. It was successful when the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed Browder v. Gayle, which struck down the laws regarding segregated seating on public buses. This was the seminal birth of the modern American Civil Rights Movement.
 
Erected 2015 by the Kenneth Mullinax Foundation, Alabama Historical Association.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansCivil RightsEducationRailroads & Streetcars. In addition, it is included in the Alabama Historical Association, and the Historically Black Colleges and Universities series lists. A significant historical date for this entry is December 1, 1955.
 
Location. 32° 21.906′ N, 86° 17.762′ W. Marker is in Montgomery, Alabama, in Montgomery County. Marker is at the
Birth of Montgomery Bus Boycott Marker (Reverse) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, December 5, 2015
2. Birth of Montgomery Bus Boycott Marker (Reverse)
intersection of Tullibody Drive and University Drive North, on the right when traveling north on Tullibody Drive. Located on the campus of Alabama State University. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Tullibody Drive, Montgomery AL 36106, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Black Members of the Alabama Legislature Who Served During The Reconstruction Period of 1868-1879 (within shouting distance of this marker); Rosa Louise Parks (within shouting distance of this marker); Alabama State University / Tullibody (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Marshall J. Moore House (about 600 feet away); Birthplace of Nat "King" Cole (approx. ¼ mile away); Home of Ralph David Abernathy (approx. ¼ mile away); Alabama State University / Tatum Street (approx. 0.3 miles away); Georgia Gilmore (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Montgomery.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia article on Jo Ann Robinson. (Submitted on December 5, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
2. Wikipedia article on the Women's Political Council. (Submitted on December 5, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Marker in front of William Hooper Councill Hall image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, December 5, 2015
3. Marker in front of William Hooper Councill Hall
Marker in wide shot of area. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, December 5, 2015
4. Marker in wide shot of area.
View of marker looking north towards South Jackson Street image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, December 5, 2015
5. View of marker looking north towards South Jackson Street
ASU entrance sign. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, December 5, 2015
6. ASU entrance sign.
Jo Ann Gibson Robinson (1912–1992) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Fair use
7. Jo Ann Gibson Robinson (1912–1992)
Booking photo
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on December 5, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 947 times since then and 92 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on December 5, 2015, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.

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Apr. 24, 2024