Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
The Fan District in Richmond, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Broad Street Station

 
 
Broad Street Station Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Kathy Walker, May 9, 2008
1. Broad Street Station Marker
Inscription.  Broad Street Station served passengers of the Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac Railway and the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad from 6 Jan. 1919 until 15 Nov. 1975. The Neoclassical Revival station was the only commercial building designed by John Russell Pope, who also designed the Branch House in Richmond and the Jefferson Memorial, National Gallery of Art, and National Archives in Washington, D.C. The station is noted architecturally for its Classical details, hundred-foot-high rotunda, and cast-iron and steel butterfly canopies that sheltered travelers from the weather. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, the station became home of the Science Museum of Virginia in 1977.
 
Erected 1995 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number SA-46.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ArchitectureCharity & Public WorkEducationRailroads & StreetcarsScience & Medicine. In addition, it is included in the Virginia Department of Historic Resources (DHR) series list. A significant historical date for this entry is January 6, 1919.
 
Location.
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
37° 33.627′ N, 77° 27.983′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Virginia. It is in The Fan District. Marker is on Broad Street, 0.2 miles east of North Arthur Ashe Boulevard (Virginia Route 161), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2500 West Broad Street, Richmond VA 23220, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. RF&P Kitchen Car 20 (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); REA Express 183 (about 500 feet away); Car ONE (about 600 feet away); Jefferson Davis (approx. 0.2 miles away); Aluminaut (approx. 0.2 miles away); C&O Kanawha Class Locomotive 2732 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Memorial Bell Tower (approx. ¼ mile away); The Boulevard Historic District (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond.
 
Also see . . .  The web site for the Science Museum of Virginia includes a brief history. "Richmonders quickly took to what they came to call "Broad Street" Station, and over the next twenty-five years, the number of passengers and trains using it grew steadily. At its peak during World War II, the Station averaged fifty-seven trains a day. On April 22, 1943, a record 33,324 arriving or departing passengers passed through the Station." (Submitted on July 16, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 
 
Broad Street Station Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Kathy Walker, May 9, 2008
2. Broad Street Station Marker
Broad Street Station clock and details. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Kathy Walker, May 9, 2008
3. Broad Street Station clock and details.
Broad Street Station Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Kathy Walker, May 9, 2008
4. Broad Street Station Marker
The moon fountain is in the foreground and the earth fountain is in the background. It shows the distance from the earth to the moon if they were at this size. The Science Museum is on the left.
New Union Station, Richmond, Va. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Louis Kaufmann & Sons, Baltimore, MD.
5. New Union Station, Richmond, Va.
VCU Libraries Digital Collections - Rarely Seen Richmond
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 1, 2023. It was originally submitted on July 16, 2008, by Kathy Walker of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,994 times since then and 146 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 16, 2008, by Kathy Walker of Stafford, Virginia.   5. submitted on May 10, 2012, by Bernard Fisher of Richmond, Virginia. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=9209

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Apr. 16, 2024