Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Farmington in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Canal Junction

 
 
Canal Junction Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Alan M. Perrie, December 18, 2015
1. Canal Junction Marker
Inscription.  
The Unionville Feeder Canal joined the Farmington Canal here, providing the water from Granby to New Haven. You are standing on the “Long Level”, 26 miles without a lock. 1828-1847.
 
Erected 2015 by Farmington Public Works.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Waterways & Vessels.
 
Location. 41° 45.367′ N, 72° 49.4′ W. Marker is in Farmington, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker can be reached from Town Farm Road. The site is located on Farmington’s Open Space, between 162 and 184 Town Farm Road. Follow the yellow blazed trail for 0.25 miles to the marker. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Farmington CT 06032, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Farmington Aqueduct (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Farmington Canal (approx. ¼ mile away); Canal Aqueduct (approx. ¼ mile away); Birthplace of Wilford Woodruff (approx. 1.2 miles away); Lest We Forget (approx. 2.1 miles away); Farmington Veterans Memorial
The Unionville Feeder Canal entered to the right of the marker. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Alan M. Perrie, December 18, 2015
2. The Unionville Feeder Canal entered to the right of the marker.
Behind the marker, the Farmington Canal crosses the Farmington Aqueduct and continued to New Haven. In front of the marker, the Farmington Canal continued north to Massachusetts.
Click or scan to see
this page online
(approx. 2.3 miles away); Farmington (approx. 2.3 miles away); Farmington and the Freedom Trail (approx. 2.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Farmington.
 
Regarding Canal Junction. The main source of water for the Farmington Canal in Connecticut was the Unionville Feeder Canal. The Farmington River was dammed downstream from the center of Unionville near the Town Hall. It was built to the same dimensions as the Farmington Canal. The long term plan for this canal was to continue up the Farmington Valley into Massachusetts, then head west to connect with the Hudson River. The long term plan for the Farmington Canal was to connect the seaport of New Haven, CT to the St. Lawrence River in Canada.
 
Also see . . .
1. . Friends of the Office of State Archaeology website entry:
Includes the original drawing plan for the junction (Submitted on January 10, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.) 

2. Farmington Canal. Wikipedia entry (Submitted on January 10, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.) 
 
The yellow blazed trail follows the towpath for the Farmington Canal. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Alan M. Perrie, December 18, 2015
3. The yellow blazed trail follows the towpath for the Farmington Canal.
The Canal is on the right. The white junction sign is located in the center of the photo.
The west abutment of the Farmington Aqueduct. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Alan M. Perrie, December 19, 2015
4. The west abutment of the Farmington Aqueduct.
If you continue on the yellow blazed trail for another 0.1 mile, you will reach the almost complete abutment. The 280 foot long Farmington Aqueduct was Connecticut’s major engineering accomplishment in the 1820’s.
Satellite map of the yellow blazed Farmington Canal and River Trail. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Alan M. Perrie, December 18, 2015
5. Satellite map of the yellow blazed Farmington Canal and River Trail.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 16, 2022. It was originally submitted on January 10, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 721 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on January 10, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=92153

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
Paid Advertisements
 
 

Dec. 3, 2022