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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Andersonville in Macon County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Raiders' Graves

 
 
The Raiders' Graves Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
1. The Raiders' Graves Marker
Inscription.  
These six graves were deliberately set apart; these six prisoners were buried with dishonor.

Only enlisted soldiers were buried at Andersonville. With no Union officers to maintain order, life in the pen became anarchy. A gang known as the Raiders roamed the prison yard, bullying, robbing, and even murdering other prisoners. Eventually, with the blessing of Commandant Wirz, the prisoners formed a police squad called the Regulators, arrested the Raiders, and tried and hanged the six ringleaders.

"Raiders took $170.00 from Dowd, he was badly cut up, but finally got away and reached the gate, and reported to Capt. Wirz, who came up with him and demanded that the robbers should be given up under penalty of no rations for one week."
Eugene Forbes, 4th New Jersey Cavalry
June 29, 1864

The names on these headstones may not be accurate. Several of the Raiders were deserters who re-enlisted under aliases.

(caption)
Before their execution, the six Raider leaders were court-martialed by their peers. Confederates provided lumber for the gallows, which was erected near the prison's
The Raiders' Execution image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
2. The Raiders' Execution
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South Gate. The remaining Raiders were forced to run a gauntlet formed by their fellow prisoners.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil. A significant historical date for this entry is June 29, 1864.
 
Location. 32° 12.205′ N, 84° 7.889′ W. Marker is in Andersonville, Georgia, in Macon County. Marker is on Cemetery Road half a mile north of Prison Site Road, on the right when traveling north. Located in the center of the Andersonville National Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 760 POW Rd, Andersonville GA 31711, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Massive Monuments (within shouting distance of this marker); Memorial to American Former Prisoners of War Stalag XVII-B (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Unknown Soldier (about 300 feet away); New York State Monument (about 300 feet away); Grave Markers (about 400 feet away); In Memory of ... (about 500 feet away); Prisoner Burials (about 600 feet away); Andersonville National Cemetery (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Andersonville.
 
Also see . . .  Andersonville National Historic Site. National Park Service (Submitted on September 1, 2015.) 
 
The Raiders' Graves Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
3. The Raiders' Graves Marker
The Raiders' Graves and Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, December 26, 2017
4. The Raiders' Graves and Marker
The graves are to the right of the marker in the distance to the south.
The Raiders' Graves Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
5. The Raiders' Graves Marker
<i>Graves of the six men hung at Andersonville, Ga., July 11th, 1864</i> image. Click for full size.
Engle & Furlong (photo - half of a stereograph image, courtesy of the Library of Congress), circa 1865
6. Graves of the six men hung at Andersonville, Ga., July 11th, 1864
These are the original headstones.
Andersonville National Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
7. Andersonville National Cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 9, 2018. It was originally submitted on September 1, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 446 times since then and 30 times this year. Last updated on March 13, 2016, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 1, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   4. submitted on December 26, 2017, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   5. submitted on September 1, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   6. submitted on February 9, 2018.   7. submitted on September 1, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

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Jul. 31, 2021