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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Russells Point in Logan County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

1913 Flood

A History of Indian Lake

 
 
1913 Flood Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, June 5, 2017
1. 1913 Flood Marker
Inscription. History has recorded many major floods and the devastation they created. One of the greatest floods ever in Ohio occurred in March of 1913. Rivers in the region, including the Great Miami River, overflowed their banks destroying many towns and cities along the way. The still-frozen ground could not absorb the 10-inch rainfall. Some thought at the time that Indian Lake spillway had burst or the banks of the reservoir had eroded away causing the flooding. After the waters receded, many Miami Valley residents believed Indian Lake should be drained to prevent future flooding. However, the Corps of Engineers quickly concluded that properties along the Miami River all the way to Dayton were flooded hours prior to any water escaping over the spillway. Had the reservoir not existed, many more lives would have been lost and more property damaged. Sidney, Piqua, Troy and many smaller communities along the river would have suffered greater damage. An estimated 420 people lost their lives in the Miami Valley.

Although damage in the Indian Lake community was not catastrophic, almost every home and business was effected. In addition, lost forever was the Miami & Erie Canal. Although no longer in operation, locks were washed out and the banks of the canal were damaged beyond repair. In 1914 Ohio passed a law, now known as the Ohio Conservancy Law

1913 Flood Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, June 5, 2017
2. 1913 Flood Marker
that created conservancy districts around the state. The first major watershed district in the nation was the Miami Conservancy District. The conservancy district currently maintains large scale flood control dry dams, flood basins and levees along several of the local rivers. Between 1918 and 1921, the Lockington Dam north of Piqua and the Englewood Dam north of Dayton, were huge undertakings of the Corps of Engineers to help prevent future flooding. In 2015 the John and Mary Rudolph Nature Area was created. This 52 acre preserve provides an additional four billion cubic feet of flood control locally.
 
Erected 2017 by The Indian Lake Historical Society.
 
Location. 40° 28.372′ N, 83° 53.708′ W. Marker is in Russells Point, Ohio, in Logan County. Marker is on West Main Street (Ohio Route 366), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in park area on the west side of Russells Point Harbor. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 West Main St., Russells Point OH 43348, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Islands and Beaches (a few steps from this marker); Our Lady of Fatima (a few steps from this marker); The Villages (a few steps from this marker);
1913 Flood Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, June 5, 2017
3. 1913 Flood Marker
Native Americans (within shouting distance of this marker); When the Music Died (within shouting distance of this marker); Sandy Beach Amusement Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Boats of Indian Lake (within shouting distance of this marker); Interurban Transportation (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Russells Point.
 
Categories. DisastersEnvironmentWaterways & Vessels
 
1913 Flood Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, June 5, 2017
4. 1913 Flood Marker
detail of picture on marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 8, 2017. This page originally submitted on June 8, 2017, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. This page has been viewed 115 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 8, 2017, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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