Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Southwest in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Long Bridge

 
 
Long Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 30, 2017
1. Long Bridge Marker
Inscription. Originally constructed in 1809 as a mile-long wooden toll bridge connecting the District with Virginia, Long Bridge has seen many transformations and additions. In 1861, five days after the fall of Fort Sumpter, Robert E. Lee rode south on Long Bridge after declining command of the Union Army. In 1881, ice piled up against the bridge, causing an unprecedented flood that put 254 acres of DC under six feet of water and led to the creation of East Potomac Park.
 
Location. 38° 52.773′ N, 77° 1.557′ W. Marker is in Southwest, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Maine Avenue SW and 9th Street SW, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. The marker is on the District Pier at the DC Wharf in Southwest Washington. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20024, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. America's Oldest Operating Fish Market (here, next to this marker); Urban Renewal (a few steps from this marker); Houseboats on the Waterfront (a few steps from this marker); Creating the Waterfront (a few steps from this marker); "a magnificent waterfront entranceway..."
Long Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 27, 2017
2. Long Bridge Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); African-American History in Southwest (within shouting distance of this marker); Civil War at the Southwest Waterfront (within shouting distance of this marker); Navigating the Potomac River (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Southwest.
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsWar, US CivilWaterways & Vessels
 
Long Bridge, Lincoln's Time.<br>Washington, DC image. Click for full size.
National Archives
3. Long Bridge, Lincoln's Time.
Washington, DC
“Union troops guarding a bridge over the Potomac River to Virginia to prevent infiltration by Confederate spies.” — National Archives
A map of the city of Washington in the District of Columbia, 1818 image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
4. A map of the city of Washington in the District of Columbia, 1818
This 1818 map of Washington by Robert King shows the Long Bridge between the words “Potomac” and “River”.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 31, 2017. This page originally submitted on October 30, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 48 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 30, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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