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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

They Lie Here, Beneath Our Feet

 
 
They Lie Here, Beneath Our Feet Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 28, 2017
1. They Lie Here, Beneath Our Feet Marker
Inscription. For nearly a century, many of Frederick's African American residents were laid to rest here in the Laboring Sons Cemetery. As the name implies, they repaired the shoes, painted the houses, cleaned the stables, nursed the sick, and performed countless other tasks necessary for the daily function of local businesses and households.

Others moved away for employment, their remains shipped back to Frederick by freight train, to be buried at home. Some former slaves lie here along with military veterans. At least eight individuals buried here served in the U. S. Colored Troops during the Civil War.

Buried with Honor

Following services in his home on DeGrange Street, the funeral procession of Civil War veteran Morton Stewart crossed town to his final resting place on April 1, 1910. Ceremoniously draped in a 46-star American flag, his coffin was respectfully carried to the grave by four pallbearers. As a soldier, Mr. Stewart served with the U. S. Colored Troops. After the war, he was a member of Frederick's Kilpatrick Colored Post, Grand Army of the Republic.
 
Location. 39° 25.26′ N, 77° 24.419′ W. Marker is in Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is at the intersection of East 6th Street and Chapel Alley, on
They Lie Here, Beneath Our Feet Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 28, 2017
2. They Lie Here, Beneath Our Feet Marker
the right when traveling west on East 6th Street. Touch for map. This marker is on the north (the 6th Street side) of Laboring Sons Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: Chapel Alley, Frederick MD 21701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Laboring Sons Memorial Ground (within shouting distance of this marker); Rediscovered Past (within shouting distance of this marker); Roger Brooke Taney (approx. 0.2 miles away); Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); John McElroy, S.J. (approx. ¼ mile away); Francis Scott Key (approx. 0.3 miles away); Enoch Louis Lowe (approx. 0.3 miles away); Former Site of Tory Gaol (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
Additional comments.
1. USCT Veterans in the Laboring Sons Cemetery
The MD Historical Trust, Inventory Form lists five USCT Veterans buried at the Laboring Sons Cemetery. “W. H. Brown, a farm laborer from Libertytown, served in the 28th Regiment, USCT, Company K. In 1870, he was 35 years old and working as a day laborer in Uniontown, living with Sarah Brown, 30, and Fran L. Brown. Henry Lee served in the 28th Regiment, Company I. Thomas Lanzell served in the 8th Regiment, Company F. William Powell served in the 2nd Regiment,
Buried with Honor image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 28, 2017
3. Buried with Honor
Yomi Fagbohun's original painting of Morton Stewart's 1910 burial.
Close-up of image on marker
Company D. Finally, Nicholas Nichols, a farmer, served in the 19th United States Federal Regiment, Company B. He was born in March 1835 as a slave for life of William Eader, a citizen of Frederick City classified as ‘loyal’ by recruiting agents when Nichols enlisted in the army. The enlistment process included Eader granting Nichols his manumission from slavery. Nichols enlisted on December 8, 1863, and suffered a stint of smallpox in April 1864. He mustered out of the military on 15 January 1867 at Brownsville, TX, as a Sergeant. Besides these, as many as 1,500 burials were made in Laboring Sons' cemetery.”
    — Submitted November 29, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.

 
Categories. African AmericansCemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 2, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 29, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 41 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 29, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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