Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Antonio in Bexar County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The River in the 1900s

 
 
The River in the 1900s Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 21, 2018
1. The River in the 1900s Marker
Inscription. The San Antonio River became a muddy, trash filled eyesore in the early 1900s. Alarmed city leaders rallied to save the beloved waterway by clearing away mud and debris, planting grass, and pumping water into the empty channel. Civic organizations, inspired by the nationwide City Beautiful Movement, soon called for more ambitious improvements. Their vision of a lushly landscaped river was shared by local architects but was at odds with engineers who favored flood channels without vegetation. When work finally began after the massive 1921 flood, groups including the newly formed San Antonio Conservation Society successfully lobbied to preserve and enhance the river's natural beauty. Architect Robert Hugman's visionary river project, completed in 1941, became the defining feature of downtown San Antonio.

The River Walk remained a quiet linear park until HemisFair '68 attracted new hotels, shops, and restaurants. Thirty years after the fair, planning began for the San Antonio River Improvements Project to extend the River Walk beyond the downtown area, creating a thirteen-mile greenbelt from Brackenridge Park south to Mission Espada.
 
Location. 29° 25.906′ N, 98° 29.267′ W. Marker is in San Antonio, Texas, in Bexar County. Marker can be reached
Marker detail: San Antonio River circa 1913 image. Click for full size.
By Courtesy: Maverick Publishing Co., San Antonio, 1913
2. Marker detail: San Antonio River circa 1913
River Commissioner George Surkey defined the river channel with low stone walls and planted grass and shrubs along the banks in 1913.
from Lexington Avenue north of Avenue A, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located on the San Antonio River Walk, on the south side of the river, 1/10 mile east of the Lexington Avenue bridge. Marker is a short walk from the 107 Avenue A parking lot. Marker is at or near this postal address: 107 Avenue A, San Antonio TX 78205, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The San Antonio River (here, next to this marker); River Communities (here, next to this marker); Missions in the San Antonio River Valley (here, next to this marker); The River in the 1800's (here, next to this marker); The Hugman Dam (a few steps from this marker); Mayor Maury Maverick Mural (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named The San Antonio River (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); Navarro Street Bridge (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Antonio.
 
More about this marker. This marker is one of five adjacent San Antonio River historical markers at this location.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. San Antonio River History
 
Also see . . .
1. Robert H. H. Hugman. His plan for the River Walk was eventually
Marker detail: High retaining walls, circa 1920 image. Click for full size.
By Courtesy: Maria Watson Pfeiffer, San Antonio, circa 1920
3. Marker detail: High retaining walls, circa 1920
High retaining walls were built along portions of the river channel in 1920 to contain floods. This view was taken north of the Pecan Street bridge.
adopted in 1938 when funding became available from the Works Progress Administration. Hugman designed 31 unique staircases for the River Walk, along with bridges, water elements, an outdoor theater, and many other features. The bridges were built with high arches to allow gondoliers to pass, as well as floats in the dreamed-of River Parade. Hugman's designs included landscaping, showing where every one of 11,000 trees and shrubs were to go among the existing bald cypress and other native trees. (Submitted on July 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. HemisFair '68. HemisFair '68, held in San Antonio from April 6 through October 6, 1968, was the first officially designated international exposition in the Southwestern United States. The fair, which commemorated the 250th anniversary of the founding of San Antonio, had its beginnings in 1959, when local business leaders, inspired by merchant Jerome K. Harris, started discussing a fair to celebrate the cultural heritage shared by San Antonio and the nations of Latin America—a "Hemis-Fair," as Harris then called it. (Submitted on July 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesParks & Recreational AreasWaterways & Vessels
 
Marker detail: King William Historic District, circa 1988 image. Click for full size.
By Courtesy: San Antonio River Authority, circa 1988
4. Marker detail: King William Historic District, circa 1988
The River Walk was extended into the newly constructed Convention Center at the time of HemisFair '68, and was completed south of downtown through the King William Historic District in 1988.
The River in the 1900s Marker (<i>wide view showing related markers; this marker at far right</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 21, 2018
5. The River in the 1900s Marker (wide view showing related markers; this marker at far right)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 5, 2018. This page originally submitted on July 2, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 30 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement