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Winchester in Frederick County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Winchester National Cemetery

 
 
Winchester National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, January 24, 2019
1. Winchester National Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  
National Cemetery
Winchester National cemetery was established in 1866 on the site of the Third Battle of Winchester. Soon after the federal government created the 5-acre cemetery, remains were moved here from the battlefields at Winchester, New Market, Front Royal, Snickers Gap, Harpers Ferry, Martinsburg, Romney, and other nearby places.

Though approximately half of the 4,440 remains buried here were known, when possible they were placed in sections designated for particular states.

By law, the secretary of war appointed a “meritorious and trustworthy” superintendent to manage the cemetery. To qualify for the position, an individual must have been an army enlisted man disabled in service. Former private Philetus Sedgwick, 125th New York Infantry, was appointed the first superintendent on October 1, 1867. He served until his death in 1874.

Monuments
The cemetery contains fourteen monuments that honor men and regiments that fought in battles in and near Winchester.

The first monument was erected in 1866 to officers and soldiers of the 14th New Hampshire who
Marker detail: Third Battle of Winchester, September 19, 1864 image. Click for full size.
Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, 1888, January 24, 2019
2. Marker detail: Third Battle of Winchester, September 19, 1864
died at the Third Battle of Winchester. Many more monuments were erected in the 1880s and 1890s, some on the anniversary of this battle, September 19.

A final wave of dedications occurred in the early 1900s. In addition to New Hampshire, regiments from Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Vermont, and troops of the 6th Army Corps are memorialized.

A monument dedicated to the 8th Vermont Volunteer Infantry, led by Col. Stephen Thomas during the Third Battle of Winchester, was moved from the battlefield to the cemetery in 1896 at the request of the Vermont quartermaster Generalís Office. It sits among the graves of Vermontís volunteer soldiers.

(sidebar)
Six Battles
Control of the Shenandoah Valley was essential for the Confederacy. Six major battles were fought in Winchester and nearby locations.

At the First Battle of Kernstown on March 23, 1862, Union Col. Nathan Kimball defeated Gen. Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson. On May 25, 1862, Jackson won a decisive victory over Union Gen. Nathaniel Banks at the First Battle of Winchester. The Second battle of Winchester, June 1863, was another Confederate victory.

Three more battles occurred here in 1864. On July 24, Confederate Gen. Jubal Early defeated Gen. George Crook at the Second Battle of Kernstown, and kept Crook from reinforcing
Marker detail: The 1871 superintendentís lodge before a second story was added, c. 1905 image. Click for full size.
National Archives and Records Administration, January 24, 2019
3. Marker detail: The 1871 superintendentís lodge before a second story was added, c. 1905
Gen. Ulysses S. Grant at Petersburg, Virginia. At the Third Battle of Winchester on September 19, Union Gen. Phillip Sheridan defeated General Early. They met again on October 19 at the Battle of Cedar Creek. Sheridan rallied his troops and drove the Confederates from the valley. It was the last major engagement in the area.
 
Erected by U.S Department of Veteran Affairs, National Cemetery Administration.
 
Location. 39° 11.102′ N, 78° 9.39′ W. Marker is in Winchester, Virginia, in Frederick County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of National Avenue (Virginia Route 7) and Fairview Ave, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 401 National Avenue, Winchester VA 22601, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A National Cemetery System (a few steps from this marker); Third Battle of Winchester (a few steps from this marker); 123rd Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 114th New York Volunteer Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 14th New Hampshire Regiment (within shouting distance of this marker); Pennsylvania (within
Marker detail: Monuments to the 3rd Massachusetts Cavalry, c. 1888. image. Click for full size.
January 24, 2019
4. Marker detail: Monuments to the 3rd Massachusetts Cavalry, c. 1888.
Four of the fourteen monuments in the cemetery honor Massachusetts soldiers. The Third Massachusetts Cavalry in the War for the Union, 1903.
shouting distance of this marker); Massachusetts (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); 6th Army Corps (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winchester.
 
Also see . . .  Winchester National Cemetery. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Cemetery Administration (Submitted on February 21, 2019.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
Winchester National Cemetery marker from a distance image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, January 24, 2019
5. Winchester National Cemetery marker from a distance
Winchester National Cemetery marker shown on the left and A National Cemetery System marker on the image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, January 24, 2019
6. Winchester National Cemetery marker shown on the left and A National Cemetery System marker on the
Winchester National Cemetery gates image. Click for full size.
7. Winchester National Cemetery gates
Gettysburg Address image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, January 24, 2019
8. Gettysburg Address
Each US National Cemetery displays a Gettysburg Address tablet. This one is attached to the administration building, Winchester National Cemetery.
 
More. Search the internet for Winchester National Cemetery.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 22, 2019. This page originally submitted on February 21, 2019, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. This page has been viewed 70 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 21, 2019, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida.   7, 8. submitted on February 22, 2019, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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