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Miami in Miami-Dade County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Crossing the Everglades

 
 
Crossing the Everglades Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, January 8, 2015
1. Crossing the Everglades Marker
Inscription.  The Tamiami Trail was crucial to opening up the wilderness and creating a link to Florida's major cities. Building a road through the heart of the Everglades was no easy task, but with the power of human ingenuity the builders were able to develop new techniques and equipment to complete the task.

The Tamiami Trail
What's in a Name?

Tamiami is derived from the two cities it connects - Tampa and Miami - to form Tamiami. It was the first road to cross the Everglades.

Constructing the Trail
Surveyors and clearing crews cut through the thick underbrush with hand saws and machetes. Blasting crews followed with a specially designed drill car and sticks of dynamite to convert the solid limestone rock to rubble. Giant Bay City "walking" dredges scooped up the blasted limestone and piled it into a rough roadbed. A bulldozer came next, flattening and smoothing the rock, soil, and sand. Finally, a fleet of trucks and tractors fine-graded the road and applied an asphalt surface to seal the new road and prevent erosion.

Working Conditions
The motto of the dreamers who wanted the Trail built was "men,
Marker detail: Stone archway on the Tamiami Trail marking the boundary of Dade and Collier counties image. Click for full size.
State Archives of Florida
2. Marker detail: Stone archway on the Tamiami Trail marking the boundary of Dade and Collier counties
money, and machinery." The slogan of the men who did the actual work was "muck, misery, and moccasins." Few of us can fully comprehend the hardships that Trail workers endured. The heat, humidity, and mosquitoes were constant challenges; alligators and venomous snakes were serious safety concerns. Even when not working, they couldn't escape the conditions. Trail workers lived on the job in portable bunkhouses that utilized rolling kitchens.

The Tamiami Trail opened to much fanfare on April 26, 1928. Taking 13 years to complete, it was a long, difficult, and expensive journey that led to that inaugural day. But in the end, a combination of hard work, persistence, and a "never quit" attitude overcame all the obstacles. Heralded at the time as an "epochal event… the greatest road built during the 20th century," the Tamiami Trail remains an engineering feat often compared to the building of the Panama Canal.
 
Location. 25° 45.65′ N, 80° 45.977′ W. Marker is in Miami, Florida, in Miami-Dade County. Marker is on Shark Valley Loop Road south of Tamiami Trail (Southwest 8th Street) (U.S. 41), on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is located at the intersection of Shark Valley Loop Road and Old Tamiami Trail, near the entrance to Everglades National Park Shark Valley Visitor
Marker detail: Giant "walking" dredge image. Click for full size.
State Archives of Florida, W. Fishbaugh
3. Marker detail: Giant "walking" dredge
Center. Marker is in this post office area: Miami FL 33194, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Life Along the Tamiami (here, next to this marker); Restoring The Everglades (here, next to this marker).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Tamiami Trail and the Everglades
 
Also see . . .
1. Tamiami Trail Officially Opened in 1928. On April 26, 1928, Miami and Tampa were joined when the 284-mile Tamiami Trail (US 41), officially opened. A project that was conceived in 1915 took until 1928 to be officially completed. To be more specific, it was the North-South portion of the highway that was conceived in 1915. The following year, Brickell Avenue resident Captain James F. Jaudon proposed an East-West portion that would connect Florida’s Gulf with its Atlantic Coast. (Submitted on April 14, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Tamiami Trail. Before the completion of the Tamiami Trail, few travelers successfully navigated the 108 miles between Miami and Naples. Wetlands, mosquitoes, alligators and cypress swamps made travel across southern Florida difficult at best. The southernmost Seminoles, known today as the Miccosukee, took up residence alongside the Tamiami Trail in the 1920s. Many Miccosukee Seminoles worked on the
Marker detail: Barge image. Click for full size.
State Archives of Florida
4. Marker detail: Barge
construction of the road and enjoyed greater access to Miami after its completion. The Miccosukee living on the Tamiami Trail built businesses specializing in crafts and animal demonstrations and led hunting expeditions into the Everglades. (Submitted on April 14, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Tamiami Trail's 90th Anniversary Celebration. Barron Gift Collier invested much of his personal wealth in building the Tamiami Trail, a gigantic project to link Florida's east and west coasts with a modern highway across the Everglades. (Submitted on April 14, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesRoads & VehiclesWaterways & Vessels
 
Crossing the Everglades Marker (<i>background image</i>) image. Click for full size.
State Archives of Florida, W. Fishbaugh
5. Crossing the Everglades Marker (background image)
Crossing the Everglades Marker (<i>wide view; leftmost of three markers at this location</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, January 8, 2015
6. Crossing the Everglades Marker (wide view; leftmost of three markers at this location)
 
More. Search the internet for Crossing the Everglades.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 14, 2019. This page originally submitted on April 14, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 49 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on April 14, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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