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Newberry in Newberry County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Calvin Crozier Murder Site

 
 
Calvin Crozier Murder Site Marker - Front image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 1, 2008
1. Calvin Crozier Murder Site Marker - Front
Inscription.
Front
Colonel Charles Trowbridge of the 33rd U.S. Colored Troops ordered the execution of Calvin Crozier, former private 3rd Kentucky Cavalry, on Sept. 8, 1865. Crozier, while en route to his Texas home, cut a troop member on the back of the neck during a quarrel concerning two ladies traveling with Crozier. Soldiers of the 33rd arrested an innocent man for the assault, but Crozier identified himself as the assailant. He was

Reverse
taken to 33rd headquarters, shot, and buried in a shallow grave about 100 yards south. The same day residents of Newberry exhumed the body, placed it in a coffin, and reburied it. In 1891 citizens moved Crozier's remains to Rosemont Cemetery about 1.4 miles west and erected a monument to his memory. The army court-martialed Trowbridge for Crozier's execution.
 
Erected 1994 by John M. Kinard Camp #35, Sons of Confederate Veterans. (Marker Number 36-13.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Sons of Confederate Veterans/United Confederate Veterans marker series.
 
Location. 34° 16.167′ N, 81° 37.017′ W. Marker is in Newberry, South Carolina, in Newberry County. Marker is on Nance Street, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is located just south of the railriad crodding of Nance Street. Marker is in this post office area: Newberry SC 29108, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance
Calvin Crozier Murder Site Marker - Reverse image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 1, 2008
2. Calvin Crozier Murder Site Marker - Reverse
of this marker. Henry McNeal Turner (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); Newberry Village Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away); Korean War (approx. 0.4 miles away); Newberry County Confederate Monument (approx. 0.4 miles away); Calvin Crozier (approx. 0.4 miles away); Newberry (approx. 0.4 miles away); Newberry County World War I Monument (approx. 0.4 miles away); National WWII Memorial (approx. 0.4 miles away); Old Court House (approx. 0.4 miles away); Vietnam War (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Newberry.
 
Also see . . .
1. Calvin Crozier: A Noble Texan Patriot by James Dark. When studying the involvement of the Lone Star State in the War Between the States, the name of Calvin Crozier comes up often in the remembrances of the old veterans. (Submitted on November 3, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. The Death of Calvin S. Crozier. Calvin Crozier was brutally murdered September 8, 1865, by negro soldiers of the Thirty-third United States colored regiment, under command of Col. Charles T. Trowbridge. (Submitted on November 3, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. General Charles Devens. Charles Devens (April 4, 1820 – January 7, 1891) was an American lawyer, jurist and statesman who was a key figure in the investigation into the unlawful execution of Confederate veteran Calvin Crozier by soldiers of the 33rd Regiment, U.S. Colored Troops, at Newberry, SC in September 1865 following
Calvin Crozier Murder Site Marker - Front, Looking Northwest image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 1, 2008
3. Calvin Crozier Murder Site Marker - Front, Looking Northwest
an altercation. Over Devens' strong objections the officer who took responsibility for the lynching was exonerated and returned to duty. (Submitted on November 3, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. 33rd U.S. Colored Troops Infantry. Organized February 8, 1864, from 1st South Carolina Colored Infantry. (Submitted on November 3, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Crozier: Four Days in September 1865. This book, published in 2005, contains the most up-to-date history on the Calvin Crozier story. (Submitted on June 8, 2009, by Charles Hanson of Newberry, South Carolina.) 

6. Calvin Crozier gravesite & monument. (Submitted on February 10, 2016.)
 
Additional comments.
1. The Ballad of Calvin Crozier
The Ballad of Calvin Crozier
(Words and music by Kirk McLeod, arranged by Seven Nations)

Good people of this town
You'd do well to gather around
There is something that I must say
A good man died here on this day
You'd do well to know his name
And it's here his gravestone lays
He was free and the soldiers didn't understand
When he returned and gave his life for another man

Calvin Crozier
They made him dig his grave
Calvin Crozier
Then they shot him where he lay
Then the soldiers danced, well they danced all night
On the shallow grave of Calvin Crozier

He had fought for four long years
Seen his share of blood and tears
He had earned his long ride home
In a boxcar for the
Calvin Crozier Murder Site Marker - Reverse, Looking Southeast image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 1, 2008
4. Calvin Crozier Murder Site Marker - Reverse, Looking Southeast
night
Union soldiers for delight
Came to make their presence known

He was free and the soldiers didn't understand
When he returned and gave his life for another man

Calvin Crozier
They made him dig his grave
Calvin Crozier
Then they shot him where he lay
Then the soldiers danced, well they danced all night
On the shallow grave of Calvin Crozier
    — Submitted November 3, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Interview; Kirk Mcleod, Author of The Ballad of Calvin Crozier
Celtic Grove: Your stature as a song writer continues to grow with each major release. We've seen very good commentaries on your song writing abilities in such major magazines as "Dirty Linen". There is a great personal touch to your songs and they seem to speak to something many Celtic music fans have in their hearts. "Can you tell us about the song writing experience and the drive you feel towards it?"

Kirk Mcleod: My first major motivation with the song writing is to capture a feeling. I want to capture a feeling in a bottle almost, so I can carry it around and share it with everyone. It is a very personal thing , but I love my heritage so of course that is what I'm going to write about as well. Some songs have a historical content of course, which may relate to my heritage or not, but they are there because I may have heard a story along the way somewhere that affected me, such as Calvin Crozier for example; you know
Calvin Crozier Murder Site Marker along Nance Street image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
5. Calvin Crozier Murder Site Marker along Nance Street
I was really touched by that story so I write that up, so I can really capture the feeling once again that I had when I heard the story, and I want to share it with someone. And again, it's typically something that relates to my heritage in some way, or some very personal experience.

CG: Your heritage obviously means a lot to you and has had a great influence on your song writing. The story of Calvin Crozier was one that particularly sparked my imagination, so much that we are reprinting an article concerning his life from a 1901 UCV magazine in its entirety accompanying this feature. The connection between Celtic culture and the culture of the American South, particularly the Appalachian Mountain region is well documented. "Is this connection something you try to be conscious of in your writing? Is there something in particular that you want people to get out of it or understand?"

KM: Well I think it's the same deal, you know, my heritage is not only Celtic but also Southern American culture. So, once again I'm writing in general, but maybe that story touched me in particular because I had a lot of family who fought for the South. I have a lot of sympathy for what all the Southern people suffered during the occupation. In history, in school it's called "Reconstruction" but it should also be called "Occupation" because the South was a conquered country at the time. If I have one mission for my writing, I'd like to expose some of the white-washed periods of our own history, and lend clarity if I can...even if I can only get through to a couple of people.

I'm no white-supremecist or anything at all like that .... but I do have a problem with the stigmatism that the South has, and I want to address that in my writing if I can. With that song, the thing I really wanted to focus on was the sacrifice of the guy's life. I wanted to focus on the sacrifice he made and not on any racial issue really. I think we have a lot of problems today related to race ... and I'm really heartbroken by that fact, because I think it stems from the way it was abolished in this violent way. In countries where it was abolished peacefully, like in some of the South American countries, there really isn't this racism based on color and I believe that's because they were released peacefully. We were really damned by those circumstances for the next 100 years and it really is a shame that we couldn't have brought about a peaceful end to slavery, but we have to work now of course towards a common understanding and everyone getting along.
    — Submitted November 3, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. African AmericansCemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 3, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 3,267 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 3, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on May 8, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
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