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Fort Wayne in Allen County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Meshekinnoquah

(Chief Little Turtle)

 
 
Meshekinnoquah Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 20, 2009
1. Meshekinnoquah Marker
Inscription. Chief Little Turtle was one of the most feared and respected leaders during the frontier wars of the 1780s and 1790s when Fort Wayne was born. Known to his people as Meshekinnoquah, Little Turtle is thought to have been born in 1752 in a village along the Eel River a few miles northeast of Columbia City.

Little Turtle rose to prominence as a warrior in 1780. As war chief of the Miami nation, he led them in defeat of the united States irregulars of Colonel LaBalme who attacked the Miami town of Kekionga (present-day Fort Wayne). In 1790, when the U.S. Army under General Josiah Harmar was sent by President Washington to destroy the Indian towns at the Three Rivers, Little Turtle assembled warriors from the region and defeated General Harmar's troops at the Battle of Kekionga on October 22, 1790. In 1791, at the present-day site of Fort Recovery, Ohio, the Indians under Little Turtle again defeated U.S. Army troops, this time under territorial governor General Arthur St. Clair, in the Army's worst defeat ever at the hands of native peoples. When General Anthony Wayne finally defeated the Indians at the Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794, Little Turtle participated in the battle with the Indian confederacy, but not as the leader.

After his military career, Little Turtle was a diplomat for his people. He was a principal
Meshekinnoquah Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 20, 2009
2. Meshekinnoquah Marker
View of historical marker in the left foreground, with a view of a second marker, the plaque to dedicated to Chief Little Turtle affixed to the large flat rock in the center foreground of the picture. Both markers being located at the site of Chief Little Turtle's final resting place.
negotator for the Indians at the Treaty of Greenville in 1795 and made four trips to the nation's capital, meeting with Presidents George Washington, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson (twice). He sought help from the Society of Friends (Quakers) to bring new farming methods to the Indians and sought federal assistance to end the illegal liquor traffic.

Little Turtle died on July 14, 1812, and was laid to rest with full U.S. military honors in the Miami burial grounds.
 
Erected by the Journal-Gazette Foundation.
 
Location. 41° 5.484′ N, 85° 7.937′ W. Marker is in Fort Wayne, Indiana, in Allen County. Marker is on Lawton Place 0.1 miles east of Spy Run Avenue, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. This historical marker is located about 0.5 miles due north of the point where the St. Mary's and St. Joseph's Rivers come together to form the Maumee River. It is located just east of Spy Run Avenue, in the middle of a residential neighborhood, about 0.1 west of the St. Joseph River. Marker is at or near this postal address: 664 Lawton Place, Fort Wayne IN 46805, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Chief Little Turtle (here, next to this marker); Site of Last French Fort (approx.
Meshekinnoquah (Chief Little Turtle) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 20, 2009
3. Meshekinnoquah (Chief Little Turtle) Marker
View of the Little Turtle Memorial Park, as seen from across the street, with the historical marker in the left background.
0.2 miles away); William Wells (approx. 0.2 miles away); Home of Philo T. Farnsworth (approx. 0.4 miles away); Duck Creek: Early Industry and Business Development (approx. half a mile away); Jail Flats (approx. half a mile away); Emerine Jane Holman Hamilton (approx. half a mile away); Earliest Railroad (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Wayne.
 
Also see . . .
1. LittleTurtle. This web link was both published and made available by, "Touring Ohio." (Submitted on August 9, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

2. Michikinikwa, Also known as Little Turtle. This link is published and made available by, "Ohio History Central," an online encyclopedia of Ohio History. (Submitted on August 9, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

3. Wikipedia entry for Michikinikwa. (Submitted on August 9, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.)
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesNative AmericansWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 9, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 1,812 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 9, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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