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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Manassas, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Mayfield Civil War Fort

The People and the Land

 

—The Manassas Museum System —

 
Mayfield Civil War Fort - The People and the Land Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 2, 2007
1. Mayfield Civil War Fort - The People and the Land Marker
Inscription. American Indians lived on the land long before white settlers and slaves came to this area. Living in nomadic hunter-gatherer groups, people called the Dogues and the Mannahoacs roamed the Northern Virginia Piedmont region. Archaeological evidence dates human activity on this site to at least 6,000 years ago. As European settlement advanced westward from the Tidewater region, the native peoples withdrew.

In 1740 Patrick Hamrick patented his tract of land, which became known as Mayfield. The following year William Davis, who either inherited or purchased Hamrick’s holdings, patented the remaining acreage that ultimately comprised the tract. In 1779, Robert Howson Hooe purchased the 160 acres and by 1861, his grandson, John Hooe, Sr. was master of Mayfield.

John Hooe, Sr. was a gentleman farmer and slaveowner who accumulated significant landholdings and wealth. An 1862 map shows numerous outbuildings associated with the farm. A square stone house was built on the land in the late 18th or early 19th century. The cemetery is northeast of where the house once stood. The Hooe family reportedly left their farm at the time of the occupation by the Confederate army in May 1861, and did not return until after the war. The ravaged land to which they returned bore little resemblance to the prosperous green fields they had left behind.
Close Up View of the Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 2, 2007
2. Close Up View of the Map

 
Erected by Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 45.187′ N, 77° 27.207′ W. Marker is in Manassas, Virginia. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Battery Heights Blvd and Quarry Road, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. South of the earthworks in Mayfield Civil War Fort Park, on the trail path, standing next to the family cemetery. Marker is in this post office area: Manassas VA 20110, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort
Hooe Family Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 2, 2007
3. Hooe Family Cemetery
(about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (about 600 feet away); Manassas 1890 - 1900s (approx. 0.6 miles away); Manassas 1862 (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Manassas.
 
More about this marker. In the lower center of the marker is a portrait of John Hooe (1791-1873) circa 1865. A map on the right side dates from the Civil War, with the caption, “Detail of the Map of the Manassas Junction, drawn by Lt. Col. J.N. Macomb, Chief Topographical Engineer for the Army of the Potomac in April 1862, showing the Hooe Plantation ‘Mayfield’.”
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Mayfield Fort – A Civil Work Earthwork Fortification. (Submitted on September 9, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
2. Notes on the State of Virginia - A description of the Indians established in that state. By Thomas Jefferson. Discusses the Mannahoacs in particular as perpetually at war with the Powhatans from the Tidewater area. (Submitted on September 9, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 9, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,699 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 9, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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