Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Montgomery in Montgomery County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Rosa Louise McCauley Parks / The Bus Stop

 
 
Rosa Louise McCauley Parks Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, October 1, 2010
1. Rosa Louise McCauley Parks Marker
Inscription.
Side A
A Lady of Courage


Born in Tuskegee, AL on February 4, 1913, to James McCauley, a carpenter, and Leona Edwards, a teacher. Moved with mother and brother to Pine Level, AL after parents' separation.

Enrolled in Mrs. White's School for Girls at age 11 and received her high school diploma from Alabama State Teachers College Laboratory High School. Married Montgomery barber Raymond Parks in 1932; both became active in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), which Mrs. Parks served as local chapter secretary. Family relocated to Detroit, MI in 1957 as result of hostility received after her courageous refusal to give up her bus seat. In 1988, the "Mother of the Civil Rights Movement" was inducted as an honorary member into Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, the oldest African American sorority in the nation. Rosa Parks was the sole class of 2008 inductee into the Alabama Women's Hall of Fame.

Side B
The Montgomery Bus Boycott


At the stop on this site on December 1, 1955, Mrs. Rosa Parks boarded the bus which would transport her name into history. Returning home after a long day working as a seamstress for Montgomery Fair department store, she refused the bus driver's order to give up her seat to boarding whites. Her arrest, conviction, and fine
The Bus Stop Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, October 1, 2010
2. The Bus Stop Marker
launched the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Boycott began December 5, the day of Parks's trial, as a protest by African-Americans for unequal treatment they received on the bus line. Refusing to ride the buses, they maintained the Boycott until the U.S. Supreme Court ordered integration of public transportation one year later. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. led the boycott, the beginning of the modern Civil Rights Movement.
 
Erected 2008 by Alabama Historical Association Sponsored by Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, incorporated during its centennial salute.
 
Location. 32° 22.655′ N, 86° 18.55′ W. Marker is in Montgomery, Alabama, in Montgomery County. Marker is at the intersection of Dexter Avenue and Commerce Street, on the right when traveling east on Dexter Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Montgomery AL 36104, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Here Stood Mrs. Rosa Parks (here, next to this marker); An Intersection of History: Court Square (here, next to this marker); Decorative Lions Heads (a few steps from this marker); The Lightning Route / Central Bank Building (a few steps from this marker); City of Montgomery / Court Square
Rosa Louise McCauley Parks / The Bus Stop Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, October 1, 2010
3. Rosa Louise McCauley Parks / The Bus Stop Marker
(a few steps from this marker); Court Square Fountain (within shouting distance of this marker); Naming the City of Montgomery / Brigadier General Richard Montgomery (within shouting distance of this marker); Telegram Which Began War Between The States / Winter Building (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Montgomery.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. (Submitted on October 9, 2010, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
2. Rosa Parks Biography. (Submitted on October 9, 2010, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil Rights
 
Rosa Louise McCauley Parks / The Bus Stop Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, October 1, 2010
4. Rosa Louise McCauley Parks / The Bus Stop Marker
marker is on the left in this picture.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 4, 2010, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. This page has been viewed 2,321 times since then and 76 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 4, 2010, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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