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Greenbelt in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Water

[Greenbelt Park]

 
 
"Water" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 26, 2011
1. "Water" Marker
Inscription.
Greenbelt Park’s streams and wetlands vividly demonstrate that what goes on outside the boundary of a park can have a profound effect on the park itself. Streambeds within the park are deeply scoured and eroded. The water that courses through them is laden with silt, and carries nutrients, oil, and other pollutants. Why? The acres of pavement around the park absorb no water; fertilizers and lubricants know no boundaries.
Water running through Greenbelt Park eventually finds its way into the Anacostia River, the Potomac, the Chesapeake, and finally the Atlantic. The National Park Service is working to rehabilitate the water that flows through the park by constructing wetland buffer areas and installing “check dams” – barriers that help slow the flow of water and filter urban pollution caused by cars and development.

Photo captions:
The reason for excessive runoff into Greenbelt Park is apparent in this aerial view (above). The park is virtually surrounded by pavement. Greenbelt is within the Anacostia River drainage. The river has been plagued by sediment and pollution. Efforts like those at Greenbelt Park will eventually help the river recover.
[Map of the Anacostia River watershed – highlighting Greenbelt Park and the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.]

Development around
"Water" Marker (center) on display near entrance to the park camping area image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 23, 2011
2. "Water" Marker (center) on display near entrance to the park camping area
the park pre-dated modern storm water management methods; during storms, water levels in park streams far exceed what they would have been 60 years ago. Many streambeds in the park are badly eroded.

The park has one natural wetland, just off the Blueberry Trail (the trail begins about 25 yards from the ranger station). Wetlands provide habitat for many species, slow the flow of water during storms, and help filter silt and impurities.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 58.752′ N, 76° 53.86′ W. Marker is in Greenbelt, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on Campsite Drive east of Park Central Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in the parking lot at the southwest corner of the park ranger station. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6565 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt MD 20770, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Greenbelt Park (here, next to this marker); Greenbelt: A Bold Experiment (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Greenbelt Park (approx. 0.6 miles away); Carrington Avenue (approx.
Greenbelt Park - signage at entrance off Greenbelt Rd. (MD 193) image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 26, 2011
3. Greenbelt Park - signage at entrance off Greenbelt Rd. (MD 193)
0.9 miles away); Charlton Avenue (approx. 0.9 miles away); Time of Horror (approx. one mile away); a different marker also named Greenbelt Park (approx. one mile away); a different marker also named Greenbelt: A Bold Experiment (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Greenbelt.
 
Also see . . .  Greenbelt Park. National Park Service (Submitted on March 31, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. 20th CenturyEnvironmentHorticulture & ForestryNatural Resources
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 28, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 378 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 28, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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