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Milledgeville in Baldwin County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Memory Hill Cemetery

 
 
Memory Hill Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
1. Memory Hill Cemetery Marker
Inscription.
As part of the Historic District of Milledgeville
has been placed on the
National Register
Of Historic Places

By the United States
Department of the Interior

 
Location. 33° 4.572′ N, 83° 13.75′ W. Marker is in Milledgeville, Georgia, in Baldwin County. Marker is on W. Franklin Street (U.S. 441) near S. Liberty Street, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Located between S. Wilkinson Street and S. Clarke Street. Marker is in this post office area: Milledgeville GA 31061, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cemetery Square (within shouting distance of this marker); The Unknown Soldiers of Brown Hospital (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Rear Admiral John W. Wilcox (about 600 feet away); The Methodist Church (about 600 feet away); Carl Vinson • Mary Green Vinson (about 600 feet away); Tomlinson Fort House (approx. 0.2 miles away); St. Stephens Episcopal Church (approx. ¼ mile away); The Old Governor's Mansion (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Milledgeville.
 
Also see . . .
1. ExploreSouthernHistory.com - Memory Hill Cemetery in Milledgeville, Georgia. The cemetery provides a quiet resting place for the remains of governors,
Memory Hill Cemetery Marker,(L) Gate at W. Franklin Street (US 441)(Ga 243) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
2. Memory Hill Cemetery Marker,(L) Gate at W. Franklin Street (US 441)(Ga 243)
S. Liberty Street Entrance
legislators, Civil War solders, an Old West outlaw and even a consultant for the movie Gone With the Wind. The noted author Flannery O'Connor is at Memory Hill, as is the woman once called the "Little Georgia Magnet" for her alleged psychic abilities. (Submitted on May 11, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. Best Known Confederate Soldier. Edwin F. Jemison, whose boy-like face has gazed out of a haunting photograph for 150 years (Submitted on May 11, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial Sites
 
Memory Hill Cemetery ,Flannery O'Connor image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
3. Memory Hill Cemetery ,Flannery O'Connor
(Mar 25, 1925-Aug 3,1964), Milledgeville's most famous daughter.She was an internationally famous fiction writer who wrote unusual stories mostly about the South.(Memory Hill Cemetery)
Memory Hill Cemetery Marvin Parks image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
4. Memory Hill Cemetery Marvin Parks
(Nov 29, 1872-Dec 29, 1926) A president of Georgia College, formerly Georgia State College for Women, for 22-1/2 years. His gravestone mimics Parks Hall, located on the college campus and named in his honor..(Memory Hill Cemetery)
Memory Hill Cemetery , Edwin Francis Jemison, b. December 1, 1844 d. July 1, 1862 image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
5. Memory Hill Cemetery , Edwin Francis Jemison, b. December 1, 1844 d. July 1, 1862
Civil War Confederate Soldier. Born the 2nd son of R.W. and S.C. Jeminson in Milledgeville, Georgia, his family was living in Louisiana when the Civil War started. He joined the 2nd Louisiana Cavalry and fought under John B. Gordon during the Peninsula Campaign. At one point during the war, he transfered to and served with the 2nd Georgia Infantry. In July of 1862, he fought in the Battle of Malvern Hill, where he was killed. Edwin was only 17 years old.
Memory Hill Cemetery ,Edwin Jemison (2nd LA Infantry) image. Click for full size.
From Monument, May 10, 2011
6. Memory Hill Cemetery ,Edwin Jemison (2nd LA Infantry)
has gazed out of a haunting photograph for 150 years
Memory Hill Cemetery Edwin Jemison Monument image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
7. Memory Hill Cemetery Edwin Jemison Monument
Memory Hill Cemetery ,Marion Wesley Stembridge image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
8. Memory Hill Cemetery ,Marion Wesley Stembridge
(Aug 28, 1892- May 2, 1953) On the day celebrating the 150th anniversary of the founding of Milledgeville, Stembridge sought out, then shot and killed, attorneys Marion Ennis and Steven "Pete" Bivins. He then committed suicide. The incident is described in the book and movie, Paris Trout.(Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
9. Memory Hill Cemetery,
Lt. Col. John M. Brown (2nd Regiment Georgia State Troops) (April 12, 1839-July 26, 1864) was the brother of Georgia Governor Joseph Brown. He was wounded “while gallantly leading his regiment in a charge on a battery of Federal artillery” in Atlanta on July 22, 1864 and died in the Governor’s Mansion in Milledgeville on July 26, 1864. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Susan Myrick image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
10. Memory Hill Cemetery, Susan Myrick
(Feb 20, 1893-Sep 3, 1978) A reporter for the Macon Telegraph starting in 1928. Among her most memorable columns were those of 1939, when she became the technical adviser for the filming of Gone With the Wind upon the recommendation of Margaret Mitchell. Myrick advised on Southern manners and traditions during its filming. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, General George Doles image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
11. Memory Hill Cemetery, General George Doles
(4th GA Vol. Infantry,Baldwin Blues) (May 14, 1830-June 2, 1864)This “diamond blue granite” monument was unveiled July 25, 1894 at the annual reunion of the 4th GA Regiment. Doles served gallantly in battles in Virginia. At Spotsylvania, in 1864, his brigade suffered very high casualties. Doles was criticized for his actions by some newspapers. At the battle of Cold Harbor, perhaps thinking of the criticism, he exposed himself excessively to enemy fire. He was shot through the chest and died the following day. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Mary V. Little Adams image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
12. Memory Hill Cemetery, Mary V. Little Adams
(Jun 20, 1847-Feb 2, 1867) This marker is carved by stone carver, J. Artopé of Macon, and shows an angel holding a quill and book, symbolizing the book of life, and a stump with ivy, symbolizing a life left unfinished when cut off by death. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery , "Our Unknown Confederate Dead" image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
13. Memory Hill Cemetery , "Our Unknown Confederate Dead"
The Soldiers’ Monument was erected in 1868. It is one of the first such Confederate monuments in Georgia. It was erected to commemorate Confederate dead in general and, more specifically, to mark the graves of unknown Confederate soldiers buried here who had died in Brown Hospital in Milledgeville in 1864. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery The Soldiers Monument image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
14. Memory Hill Cemetery The Soldiers Monument
Memory Hill Cemetery, William A. Choice C.S.A. Rome Light Guards image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
15. Memory Hill Cemetery, William A. Choice C.S.A. Rome Light Guards
(died August 15, 1879) was one of Atlanta's finest amateur actors of the 1850s. He also drank heavily. Unprovoked he shot and killed a man in Atlanta. His only defense was insanity. His performance during the trial won him an acquittal but confinement to the Asylum in Milledgeville. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery William A. Choice Grave image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
16. Memory Hill Cemetery William A. Choice Grave
Memory Hill Cemetery, Central State Hospital image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
17. Memory Hill Cemetery, Central State Hospital
(formerly the State Lunatic Asylum) On December 28, 1837, the Georgia State Legislature passed a bill that created a "State Lunatic, Idiot, and Epileptic Asylum." In 1842, the first patient was admitted. By the 1960s the inpatient census was over 12,000, making the asylum in Milledgeville one of the largest mental hospitals in the world at the time, leading to the phrase “Gone to Milledgeville” to indicate insanity. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery,The Unknown Soldiers of Brown Hospital image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
18. Memory Hill Cemetery,The Unknown Soldiers of Brown Hospital
These Confederate soldiers, all serving in the Georgia Militia, died at Brown Hospital in Milledgeville and were buried at this location. Their names soon became lost, and they were concidered Unknown Soldiers until 2003 when their identies were discovered. Marion Adkinson, Pvt., Co. F, 5th Regt., August 23, 1864 James T. Buckner, Pvt., Co. F, 9th Regt., August 31, 1864 Hugh Cannell, Pvt., Co. E, 12th Regt., September 3, 1864 Elisha B. Cape, Pvt., Co. A, 5th Regt., August 29, 1864 Edward M. Clark, Pvt., Co. F, 1st Bn., September 1, 1864 Ringold Commander, Pvt., Co. B, G.M.I. Cadet, August 27, 1864 J.R. Ellis, Pvt., Co. B, 2nd Bn., August 4, 1864 William Fussell, Pvt., Co. B, 2nd Regt., August 29, 1864 James M. Green, Pvt., Co. F, 9th Regt., August 31, 1864 Willis Harrell, Pvt., Co. I, 2nd Regt., September 7, 1864 J.M. Hutcherson, Pvt., Co. K, 6th Regt., August 24, 1864 William E. Joyner, Pvt., Co. F, 8th Regt., September 7, 1864
Thomas Judge, Pvt., Co. G, 2nd Regt., August 24, 1864 John Meadors, Pvt., Co. D, 1st Regt., July 28, 1864 Roland Mercer, Pvt., Co. F, 7th Regt., September 10, 1864 Owen Ramsey, Pvt., Co. I, 5th Regt., August 16, 1864 Aaron Rogers, Pvt., Co. C, 2nd Regt., August 22, 1864 William Tapley, Pvt., Co. H, 2nd Regt., September 3, 1864 Reddick Thorton, Pvt., Co. I, 11th Regt., August 27, 1864 William Tillory, Pvt., Co. D, 1st Regt., September 12, 1864 Green B. Turner, Pvt., Co. F, 6th Regt., August 18, 1864 J.M. Winn, Pvt., Co. F, 2nd Regt., August 2, 1864 Mordical W. Wood, Pvt., Co. I, 1st Regt., August 23, 1864 James, J. Wren, Pvt., Co. G, 2nd Regt.,September 8, 1864
———

The following Confederate soldiers died at Stout Hospital in Midway, Ga.    They are buried at Midway Cemetery in unmarked graves.

William Etheridge, Pvt., Co. K, 57th Georgia, August 1, 1864 Frank Marion Herndon, Pvt., Phelan's Battery, September 17, 1864 Frank Washington Legare, Pvt., Co. E, 5th Georgia Militia, September 27, 1864 John Lemmons, Pvt., Co. H, 24th South Carolina, March 13, 1865 Henry Walker, Pvt., Co. E, 1st & 4th Missouri, July 30, 1864
Memory Hill Cemetery,Jesse Sanford Beall (Co. K 51st GA), at right image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
19. Memory Hill Cemetery,Jesse Sanford Beall (Co. K 51st GA), at right
(October 18, 1840-Nov. 30, 1863) was Captain of the “Albany Greys” in Semms’ Brigade. He fought through the Virginia campaigns under General Lee and was wounded at Chancellorsville. At Chickamauga, while leading his company in an assault, he fell mortally wounded. He was buried on the field. His remains were reburied here in March 1866. His monument is a broken column symbolizing his life was cut short and a wreath of oak leaves symbolizing his military strength. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Monument reads: Capt:Beall
Commanded the "Albany Greys' of the 51st Regiment Geo: Volunteers, Semms' Drigade: He fought through the Virginia Campaigns under GenL- Lee wounded at Chancellorsville- was at the Battle of Chickamauga- and while gallantly leading his company to an assukt upon one of the forts in front of Knoxville, fell mortally wounded on the 29th- and died on the 30th November 1863, he was buried on the field with military Honors- and his remains now rest beneath this monument erected to his memory by his father.
Memory Hill Cemetery, Patrick Kane image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
20. Memory Hill Cemetery, Patrick Kane
(died November 20, 1864) was not a Confederate soldier. However, he was killed by Federal troops advancing on Milledgeville, the only violent death during Sherman’s capture and occupation of Milledgeville. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Dr. John Ruggles Cotting, Former Georgia State Geologist image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
21. Memory Hill Cemetery, Dr. John Ruggles Cotting, Former Georgia State Geologist
(1784-October 13, 1867) was born in Massachusetts and was a professor at Amherst and other colleges. After 1810 he helped establish St. Stephens church in Milledgeville. In the 1830s he was engaged as the Georgia State Geologist and began a statewide survey of Georgia. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Dr. John Ruggles Cotting Grave image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
22. Memory Hill Cemetery, Dr. John Ruggles Cotting Grave
Memory Hill Cemetery, Legislators image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
23. Memory Hill Cemetery, Legislators
These four men, members of the state legislature when it was in Milledgeville, died before the coming of the railroad and were unable to be shipped home for burial. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Samuel Beckcom (Beckham) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
24. Memory Hill Cemetery, Samuel Beckcom (Beckham)
(Nov. 21,1760-Nov. 2, 1825) served in the Revolutionary War as a Lieutenant and later a Captain in Colonel William Thompson’s Regiment of South Carolina Rangers. He also commanded a rifle company for the greater part of the war under Gen. Elijah Clarke. He was wounded at the Siege of Augusta. After the war in about 1802 he commanded militia at Fort Hawkins (in Macon). (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery Elizabeth Taylor Jordan image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
25. Memory Hill Cemetery Elizabeth Taylor Jordan
Memory Hill Cemetery, Elizabeth Taylor Jordan image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
26. Memory Hill Cemetery, Elizabeth Taylor Jordan
(August 4, 1796- June 4, 1858) This beautiful monument was created by Robert E. Launitz of New York who is known as “the Father of Monumental Art in America.” The marble is from Carrera, Italy. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery,Elizabeth Taylor Jordan image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
27. Memory Hill Cemetery,Elizabeth Taylor Jordan
Sacred to the Memory of Elizabeth Taylor, Relict of Green H. Jordan
Memory Hill Cemetery, Nathan C. Barnett image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
28. Memory Hill Cemetery, Nathan C. Barnett
(June 28,1801- February 2, 1890) was Georgia Secretary of State during the Civil War. When General Sherman’s forces entered Milledgeville in November 1864, Barnett hid the Great Seal of the State of Georgia in a pig pen to keep it from falling into the Federal army’s hands. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Dr. Samuel Gore White image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
29. Memory Hill Cemetery, Dr. Samuel Gore White
(1824-1877) served as Surgeon in Cobb's Legion, Georgia Volunteers,64th Regiment of Georgia Infantry, C.S.A., Army of Northern Virginia. Dr. White served as Assistant Surgeon in the U.S. Navy during the Mexican War. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Wm. Fish Family Vault image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
30. Memory Hill Cemetery, Wm. Fish Family Vault
This partially subterranean 1840s vault contains the remains of 6 people. The story is that if you knock on the door and ask Mr. Fish what he is doing in there, you will get an answer. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Nancy Alston image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
31. Memory Hill Cemetery, Nancy Alston
(died 1878) was the trusted nurse and former slave of Dr. Tomlinson Fort’s family. The family thought so highly of her that she was given Dr. Fort’s old office building to live in upon the division of his estate. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Bill Miner (1843-Sep 2, 1914) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
32. Memory Hill Cemetery, Bill Miner (1843-Sep 2, 1914)
was a notorious stagecoach and train robber. The books, The Grey Fox and Bill Miner—Stagecoach and Train Robber, describe his life. He died in the State Prison on state route 22 west of Milledgeville from which he had escaped several times. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Dr. Benjamin Judson Simmons image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
33. Memory Hill Cemetery, Dr. Benjamin Judson Simmons
(October 16,1870-January 7, 1910) was the first black physician in Milledgeville. He graduated from Meharry Medical College in 1897. He was very successful and recognized as a fine diagnostician. He died of an unintentionally selfinflicted gunshot wound.(Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, McMillan family lot - image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
34. Memory Hill Cemetery, McMillan family lot -
James W. McMillan told people that they were living on a gold mine of red clay. He owned a well-known brick business in the late 1800s and created the famous brick rope which surrounds the lot. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Buffalo Soldiers -James A. Gibson image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
35. Memory Hill Cemetery, Buffalo Soldiers -James A. Gibson
(Sept.13, 1880-May 5, 1945), a Buffalo Soldier, the name given to black Americans fighting in the Indian Wars of the 1870s, 1880s and the Spanish American War. They fought in the Spanish American War, charging up San Juan Hill with Teddy Roosevelt. They later served in the Philippines. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery , Lucius James Lamar (Cadet, Co. B, GA. Military Institute) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
36. Memory Hill Cemetery , Lucius James Lamar (Cadet, Co. B, GA. Military Institute)
(May 10, 1847-June 11, 1924) enlisted in the GMI cadet corps June 15, 1864 at the age of 17. Five months later he was defending Milledgeville, with two companies of cadets and some prisoners released from the Milledgeville State Penitentiary, against the army of General Sherman. Because of overwhelming odds, the cadets retreated from Milledgeville without offering resistance. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Kate L. Cline image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
37. Memory Hill Cemetery, Kate L. Cline
(died Aug. 1, 1884) gravestone consists of an anchor, cross, ferns and a wreath of flowers symbolizing well-grounded hope (anchor) and victory in death (wreath) with humility (ferns) and Christianity (cross). (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Jacob M. Caraker (Co.. H, 4th GA, Baldwin Blues) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
38. Memory Hill Cemetery, Jacob M. Caraker (Co.. H, 4th GA, Baldwin Blues)
(February 11, 1838-November 2, 1907) Elected Captain of the Baldwin Blues May 9, 1861. Before the war he was captain of the guard at the state penitentiary in Milledgeville. Severely wounded at the battle of Sharpsburg on September 17, 1862, he resigned February 3, 1863. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Lewis Holmes Kenan (Co. I., 1st GA Reg.) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
39. Memory Hill Cemetery, Lewis Holmes Kenan (Co. I., 1st GA Reg.)
(Jan. 18, 1833-July 3, 1871) was wounded July 7, 1864 at John’s Island, SC. He was State Senator and Secretary of the Georgia Senate. He was murdered on Hancock Street by John R. Strother, who had recently married Kenan’s father’s widow. Strother escaped justice by being shipped out of town, by train, concealed in a crate. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery , Carl Vinson (Nov 18, 1883-Jun 1, 1981) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
40. Memory Hill Cemetery , Carl Vinson (Nov 18, 1883-Jun 1, 1981)
served in the US Congress for 50 years as a representative from the 6th District of Georgia. He is credited with being the father of the "two ocean Navy" because he urged the creation of the Pacific Fleet, and he created a 10- year plan to build a strong navy and construct ships starting in the early 1930s. It is his foresight that helped prepare the U.S. for World War II. An aircraft carrier, the U.S.S. Carl Vinson, was named for him: the first time a vessel was named for a living person. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, James W. Herty image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
41. Memory Hill Cemetery, James W. Herty
(August 14, 1838-December 20, 1876 - gravestone is incorrect) After graduation from the University of New York, James Herty joined the United States Navy as an assistant surgeon. He was assigned to the USS San Jacinto patrolling off the African coast. Returning from African waters, the San Jacinto intercepted the British ship HMS Trent carrying Confederate diplomats to England. After returning to port in Boston in November 1861, Herty resigned from the US Navy and stated his desire to join the Confederacy. He was exchanged for a U.S. physician held by the Confederacy. Herty was assigned to the CSS Richmond and then the Rappahannock. He is the only veteran in Memory Hill who honorably served both the Confederacy and the United States during the Civil War. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Charles Holmes Herty image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
42. Memory Hill Cemetery, Charles Holmes Herty
(Dec 4, 1867-Jul 27, 1938) Charles Holmes Herty was a noted researcher and chemist. He also was University of Georgia’s first football coach. He invented a device that allowed young pines to mature and reseed while allowing extraction of turpentine or other products. In the 1930s, he proved that high-quality newsprint and other paper products could be made from Southern pine, thereby greatly aiding the economy of the South. It is for this achievement that most Georgians hold him in highest esteem. Note the pine tree planted at his head.(Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Benjamin Jordan image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
43. Memory Hill Cemetery, Benjamin Jordan
(ca. 1793-October 11, 1856) was a wealthy plantation owner. The monument was created by Robert E. Launitz of New York, who also designed the similar Pulaski Monument in Savannah. It was erected in March 1858 at a cost of $20,000. It is 37 feet tall not including the figure at the top that represents Hope. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Andrew J. Micklejohn (Co B. 1st. GA. Batt.) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
44. Memory Hill Cemetery, Andrew J. Micklejohn (Co B. 1st. GA. Batt.)
(died Nov. 24, 1861) was the first local battle casualty of the Civil War, having been killed during the bombardment of Ft. Pickens, near Pensacola, FL. His body was returned to Milledgeville and buried in a ceremony that the entire city attended. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Benjamin White image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
45. Memory Hill Cemetery, Benjamin White
(1793-1866) Surgeon General of the Georgia State Troops. He did not want a gravestone and so his friends planted this oak as a headstone for his grave. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery,Dr. Andrew J. Foard (died March 18, 1868) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
46. Memory Hill Cemetery,Dr. Andrew J. Foard (died March 18, 1868)
This tombstone, erected in 1896, misspells the name. "Foard" is correct. Dr. Foard was the Medical Director of the Army of Tennessee. In February 1865 he was promoted to Medical Inspector of the armies and hospitals in the States of Georgia, Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. After the war he was a professor at the Washington Medical College in Baltimore. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
47. Memory Hill Cemetery, Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar
(Jul 15, 1797-Jul 4, 1834) Judge of the Ocmulgee Circuit and mentioned in J. F. Kennedy’s Profiles in Courage. Lamar committed suicide. A false legend relates that he had hanged an innocent man and was remorseful. His brother Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar was the second President of the Republic of Texas. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery. Bonner Dogs: Nick and Bruno image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
48. Memory Hill Cemetery. Bonner Dogs: Nick and Bruno
(died 1926 and 1931), favorite dogs of Charles Bonner. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery Legislators image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
49. Memory Hill Cemetery Legislators
Despite the bronze plaque, only 9 of these box markers are for legislators who were serving when Milledgeville was the state capital. Henry Denison (May 31, 1796- October 31, 1819) was never a legislator or politician. Born in Vermont, Denison was a Milledgeville school teacher and poet. A sample of his poetry was published in 1828 in the book The Columbian Lyre. He also helped found the Southern Recorder newspaper. However, he died of fever before the first issue was printed. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery 9 Legislators image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
50. Memory Hill Cemetery 9 Legislators
Memory Hill Cemetery, image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
51. Memory Hill Cemetery,
Dixie Haygood also known as Annie Abbott, “The Little Georgia Magnet” (died Nov. 21, 1915 age 54) performed for large audiences and royalty throughout the world in the 1890s. She was known as an “electric” girl and spiritualist who, despite weighing only 96 pounds and being short in stature, had the power to resist attempts by strong men to lift her or push her backwards. Her act is still sometimes performed by magicians and is known as the “Annie Abbott” act. Charles Haygood, (November 10, 1855-February 27, 1886), husband of Dixie Haygood and a Deputy Sheriff, was shot twice at point blank range in the chest, by Elias N. "Sam" Ennis during a prohibition rally. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Carlos Wilson image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
52. Memory Hill Cemetery, Carlos Wilson
(1843-Oct 8,1906) was a bugler in Company F, 2nd Michigan Cavalry in the Union army. Like the other Union veterans buried here, he came to Milledgeville after the Civil War. Here he became an inventor, patenting a Cotton Seed Planter and Guano Distributing Machine. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
53. Memory Hill Cemetery,
David Brydie Mitchell (Oct. 22, 1760-Apr. 22, 1837) served as governor of Georgia from 1809-1813 and 1815-1817, during which time he passed an act to prevent dueling and set up a system at the state penitentiary in Milledgeville that was more than simple imprisonment — teaching prisoners to learn a trade. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery Gov. David Brydie Mitchell image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
54. Memory Hill Cemetery Gov. David Brydie Mitchell
Memory Hill Cemetery, Tomlinson Fort image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
55. Memory Hill Cemetery, Tomlinson Fort
(Jul 14, 1787-May 11, 1859) This wounded War of 1812 veteran served in the US House of Representatives (1827-1829) and the Georgia state legislature (1818-1825). He was a prominent physician and was instrumental in creating the Georgia Lunatic Asylum in 1837 and a Board of Physicians which licensed doctors. His book, A Dissertation on the Practice of Medicine, published in 1849, contains some of the best-known medical treatments of the day. Wilkes Flagg (buried across the street at Flagg’s Chapel) (about 1801-Nov 13, 1878) was a slave who, prior to the Civil War, bought his and his family’s freedom from his owner, Dr. Tomlinson Fort, by working after hours as a blacksmith. Their freedom was kept secret, however, because of the attitude against free blacks. After the war, he built Flagg’s Chapel, which he also used for instructing others in economic and social matters. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, John Marlor image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
56. Memory Hill Cemetery, John Marlor
(February 11, 1789- October 13, 1835) was the architect and builder of the Masonic Hall on Hancock Street, as well as several outstanding private homes. His marker includes symbols of masons’ tools. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Abner Hammond image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
57. Memory Hill Cemetery, Abner Hammond
(Jan. 25, 1762-Jul. 9, 1829) served as a Lieutenant and later a Captain in the South Carolina Troops during the Revolutionary War. He raised a volunteer company and joined his brother at the Siege of Augusta in 1781. He served as Georgia’s Secretary of State from 1811 to 1823. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery,Thomas Petters Carnes image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
58. Memory Hill Cemetery,Thomas Petters Carnes
(name on marker is misspelled) (1762-May 5, 1822) served as a colonel in the Maryland Line in the Revolutionary War. He held various offices and judgeships, and from 1793-1795, he was a member of Congress. In 1806 he participated in determining the location of the 35 degree of latitude that separates Georgia from North Carolina and Tennessee. Errors crept into the calculations. As a result, the survey line runs about four miles south of the actual 35th degree line, thus making Georgia slightly smaller than it ought to have been. Consequently Chattanooga is in Tennessee rather than in Georgia. Carnesville, GA was named for him. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill Cemetery, Seth N. Boughton image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
59. Memory Hill Cemetery, Seth N. Boughton
(1801-March 29, 1877) was the fiery editor of the Federal Union newspaper from 1851 until his death in 1877. He was an outspoken champion of Southern rights, Georgia, and Milledgeville. (Memory Hill Cemetery tour)
Memory Hill John S. Thomas image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
60. Memory Hill John S. Thomas
1 Lt. Thomas'
60
Ga. Militia
War of 1812
Memory Hill Cemetery C.S.A. B.H. Jones image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 10, 2011
61. Memory Hill Cemetery C.S.A. B.H. Jones
Cutts
Batry. Altry.
 
 
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