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Brackettville in Kinney County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Seminole Indian Scouts’ Cemetery

(Founded on Fort Clark Reservation, Sept. 1, 1872)

 
 
Seminole Indian Scouts' Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 12, 2010
1. Seminole Indian Scouts' Cemetery Marker
Inscription. Burial site of heroic U.S. Army men, families, and heirs. These Seminoles came mainly from Florida about 1850; lived in northern Mexico or Texas; joined Lt. (later a general) John L. Bullis and Col. Ranald S. Mackenzie in ridding Texas of hostile Indians, 1870s.

Incised on a plate on the back of marker:
The following are among the many scouts buried here: John Bowlegs, Elijah Daniels, Pompey Factor, Renty Grayson, John Jefferson, Billy July, Sampson July, George Kibbit, Issac Payne, Pompey Perryman, Joseph Phillips, Billie Wilson, Issac Wilson, Kelina Wilson.
 
Erected 1971 by the State of Texas. (Marker Number 4638.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Medal of Honor Recipients marker series.
 
Location. 29° 16.378′ N, 100° 26.567′ W. Marker is in Brackettville, Texas, in Kinney County. Marker can be reached from Ranch to Market Road 3348 3 miles south of U.S. 90. Touch for map. In the cemetery, which is within Brackettville limits. Marker is in this post office area: Brackettville TX 78832, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Seminole Scout Camp on Fort Clark (approx. 1.4 miles away); Forsyth Bridge
Seminole Indian Scouts' Cemetery Marker, reverse image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 12, 2010
2. Seminole Indian Scouts' Cemetery Marker, reverse
"The following are among the many Scouts buried here:..."
(approx. 1.6 miles away); John Horse (approx. 2.4 miles away); Site of Original Post Cemetery (approx. 2.4 miles away); Commanding Officer's Quarters (was approx. 2.4 miles away but has been reported missing. ); Staff Officers' Quarters (approx. 2½ miles away); U.S. Army Signal Corps Building (approx. 2½ miles away); Adjutant's Quarters (Quarters #20) (approx. 2½ miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Brackettville.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. Interred in this cemetery are the three Seminole Scout Medal of Honor recipients featured on a marker placed in 2006 at a scenic overlook off US Hwy 90 at Pecos River Canyon in Val Verde County.
 
Also see . . .
1. SISCA - Seminole Indian Scouts Cemetery Association. (Submitted on September 6, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Find-a-Grave: Seminole Indian Scouts' Cemetery. (Submitted on September 6, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
3. Pompey Factor. Encyclopedia of Arkansas History & Culture (Submitted on September 6, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
Adam Paine, Medal of Honor image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
3. Adam Paine, Medal of Honor
Tombstone reads: Adam Paine, Medal of Honor, Pvt, Indian Scouts, Indian Wars, 1843-1877
 
 
Additional comments.
1.
Every September, in memory of the disbandment of the Seminole-Negro Indian Scout Detachment in 1914, our Seminole community gathers to remember their Indian Scout ancestors. Their cemetery is always the centerpiece of that celebration. To the south and west of the Seminole camp on Fort Clark is the burial ground of the Scouts and their descendants. Four recipients of the Congressional Medal of Honor are interred here. Under the lone twisted oak at the back of the cemetery are the two First Sergeants, John Shields and Ben July, the other scouts in uneven rows out in the hot Texas sun. On Semi-nole Day a small American flag is placed in front of each government head-stone, a garden of flags for the scouts in their final camp.


History of the Seminole Indian Scout Cemetery
By Miss Charles Emily Wilson

The history of the Seminole Cemetery is as unique and historical as the In-dian Scouts who are buried here. Approximately 100 or more Negro Seminole Scouts who played a major role in protecting the Texas frontier from hostile Indians are buried here, with the descendants and families of the scouts.

The Negro Seminole Indian Scout cemetery was established in September 1872 on the Fort Clark Reservation. April 14, 1881 the scouts fought
Isaac Payne, Medal of Honor image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 12, 2010
4. Isaac Payne, Medal of Honor
Trumpeter, Indian Scouts, Indian Wars, 1854-1904
their last Indian battle following the final important raid on Texas soil near the Rio Grande.

At that time the cemetery was under supervision of Deacon Tony Wilson who left us many years ago. “Uncle Tony,” also left us with a constant sense of pride, to be proud of our ancestors and their accomplishments, “To preserve and hallow these grounds that these dead may not have died in vain.”

After the passing away of Uncle Tony, Mr. Warren Perryman (Uncle Warren we respectfully called him) became chairman of our group. He passed away and was buried in Stockton, California, in recent years.

Uncle Warren was responsible, helped by city officials, for obtaining from the War Department, about 1940, headstones that now mark the graves of over 100 scouts buried here. His principles and ideals were: be proud of your heritage; do not forget the graves of these scouts; honor them and cherish them.

During these years was a period of disinterest and complacency, when fami-lies would just come on Memorial Day, May 30, and prepare to honor the graves.

Around 1965, the restoration and preservation of the cemetery began. The lo-cal historical society, chamber of commerce, the Retama Garden Club, and in-terested individuals donated their time and finances to this effort.

The grandson of Scout Pompey Perryman, Carlton Perryman
The plot of Scouts Paine and Payne, MOH image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 12, 2010
5. The plot of Scouts Paine and Payne, MOH
reorganized the as-sociation in 1967. He was a retired sergeant in the U.S. Army, and a veteran of World War II and Korea. Inspired by his uncle, Warren Perryman, he ac-cepted the challenge with vigor and determination.

The organization is now registered with the State of Texas as non-profit, and is properly constituted with a board of directors and laws. Its sole purpose is to preserve, promote and maintain the Seminole Indian Scout Ceme-tery as a historical monument. In 1977, our four Scout medal winners re-ceived new grave markers.

Membership in the association includes almost every member of Brackett-ville’s Negro population, most of whom can trace their ancestry to one of the courageous Scouts. The old scouts are gone, maybe from on high they still watch over us with unseen eyes and guidance.

“The Descendants Creed”

We descendants solemnly promise to study the history of our ancestors and to live our lives in a manner that gives honor to their memory. We recognize that much of their story is held by our oldest family members who are oral historians and they should be regularly interviewed and always respected. We are grateful to all teachers, students, researchers, scholars, and any interested parties who would learn the truth about our rich heritage. Whether we call ourselves Estelusti Freedman, Black Seminoles, Ma-roons, Los
John Ward, Medal of Honor image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 12, 2010
6. John Ward, Medal of Honor
Sergeant, Indian Scouts, Indian Wars, 1846-1911.
Mascogos Indios, or Seminoles, we do confirm that our collective story springs from America, Africa, and Mexico. A story written during difficult times requiring hard choices of souls whose only weapons were their beliefs, courage, and determination to survive. We gratefully accept these gifts as our inheritance and we are proud to pass this legacy on to any or all who would receive them through de-scent or adoption.

By: William “Dub” Warrior and “Pompey Bruner” Fixico a.k.a. Phil Fixico ©2004
    — Submitted May 14, 2012, by William F Haenn of Fort Clark (Brackettville), Texas.

 
Categories. African AmericansCemeteries & Burial SitesNotable PersonsWars, US Indian
 
Pompey Factor, Medal of Honor image. Click for full size.
National Archives and Records Administration
7. Pompey Factor, Medal of Honor
Private, Indian Scouts, Indian Wars, 1849-1928 - the fourth Seminole Scout MOH recipient, also interred in the Scouts' Cemetery
Seminole Indian Scouts' Cemetery entrance image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 12, 2010
8. Seminole Indian Scouts' Cemetery entrance
Pompey Factor image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, October 18, 2003
9. Pompey Factor
Seminole Indian Scouts' Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, circa 1996
10. Seminole Indian Scouts' Cemetery Marker
An older picture of the marker.
Graves of Seminole Scout First Sergeants John Shield and Ben July image. Click for full size.
By William F Haenn, September 8, 2006
11. Graves of Seminole Scout First Sergeants John Shield and Ben July
Grave of Scout Robert Kibbetts (note old style government headstone) image. Click for full size.
By William F Haenn, September 8, 2006
12. Grave of Scout Robert Kibbetts (note old style government headstone)
Robert Kibbetts was one the original Scouts who enlisted in 1870 when the detachemnt was formed. He served for 35 years until 1905. Because scout enlistments lasted only six months, Kibbetts reenlisted seventy times during his service as a Scout.
Sergeant Robert Kibbetts image. Click for full size.
Courtesy Museum of the Big Bend, Sul Ross State University, July 1888
13. Sergeant Robert Kibbetts
Pompey Factor plaque at the Arkansas State Capitol in Little Rock image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 1, 2007
14. Pompey Factor plaque at the Arkansas State Capitol in Little Rock
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 13, 2010, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 2,137 times since then and 192 times this year. Last updated on May 14, 2012, by William F Haenn of Fort Clark (Brackettville), Texas. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 6, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3. submitted on February 13, 2010, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on September 6, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   9. submitted on January 20, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   10. submitted on February 13, 2010, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   11. submitted on May 1, 2012, by William F Haenn of Fort Clark (Brackettville), Texas.   12, 13. submitted on May 13, 2012, by William F Haenn of Fort Clark (Brackettville), Texas.   14. submitted on January 20, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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