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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Leander in Williamson County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

“Webster Massacre”

 
 
Webster Massacre Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, August 9, 2008
1. Webster Massacre Marker
Inscription.
Here sleep
the victims of the
"Webster Massacre"
of August 27, 1839
About thirty homeseekers
headed by John Webster
enroute to what is now Burnet
County, were attacked by a band
of Comanche Indians
After attempting to flee under
cover of darkness, they
were trapped in this vicinity
Mrs. Webster and her two children
were captured and later released
All the others were killed
Martha Webster then but
three years old was later
married to Marmaduke Strickland

 
Erected 1936 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 9369.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Texas 1936 Centennial Markers and Monuments marker series.
 
Location. 30° 34.975′ N, 97° 49.583′ W. Marker is near Leander, Texas, in Williamson County. Marker can be reached from FM 2243 2 miles east of Leander, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. In Davis Cemetery. Marker is in this post office area: Leander TX 78641, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Leanderthal Lady (approx. 1.6 miles away); a different marker also named Webster Massacre
Marker (center by tree) in front of common grave image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, June 28, 2009
2. Marker (center by tree) in front of common grave
(approx. 1.6 miles away); Leander (approx. 1.6 miles away); Norton Moses Lodge No. 336, A.F. & A.M. (approx. 1.8 miles away); Leander Schools (approx. 1.8 miles away); Leander United Methodist Church (approx. 1.8 miles away); Leander Presbyterian Church (approx. 1.8 miles away); Pickle-Mason House (approx. 2.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Leander.
 
Also see . . .
1. Webster Massacre, Handbook of Texas Online. (Submitted on June 28, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.)
2. Council House Fight, Handbook of Texas Online. Mrs. Webster and her daughter reportedly escaped from the Comanches while camped near San Antonio to attend a council for prisoner exchange in 1840. That meeting in San Antonio culminated in the "Council House Fight". Mrs. Webster's son was returned as part of a prisoner exchange after the Council House Fight. (Submitted on June 28, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

3. The Great Comanche Raid: Boldest Indian Attack of the Texas Republic, by Donaly E. Brice. Brice's book explains how events such as the Webster massacre (in particular the role
Lid of sarcophagus that serves as common grave. image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, June 27, 2009
3. Lid of sarcophagus that serves as common grave.
The inscription on the lid was done (or re-done) as recently as 2008. It reads in part "To the memory [of] Washington Perry Reese and William Parker Reese. Killed with John Webster and Company by Comanche Indians August 27th 1839 AD"
of captives) were key in precipitating subsequent events that would define Texas and Comanche bitter relations for the rest of the 1800s, namely the Council House Fight in San Antonio, which in turn led to the burning of Victoria and Linnville by the Comanches, which in turn resulted in retaliation by Texians (citizens of the Republic of Texas) at the Battle of Plum Creek. (Submitted on June 28, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

4. Historical marker for Casas Reales, site of Council House Fight. (Submitted on July 7, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.)
5. Link to the marker at Hornsby Bend. The Webster party started at Hornsby Bend, east of what is now Austin, TX (Submitted on November 19, 2011, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian
 
Wider view of the cemetery. Marker by tree center. image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, August 9, 2008
4. Wider view of the cemetery. Marker by tree center.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 26, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 28, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 2,337 times since then and 162 times this year. Last updated on October 13, 2012, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 28, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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