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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

McGavock Confederate Cemetery

 
 
McGavock Confederate Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 25, 2013
1. McGavock Confederate Cemetery Marker
Inscription. After the Battle of Franklin, November 30, 1864, the Union Army withdrew into Nashville. Casualties of over 8,000 Union and Confederate soldiers lay upon the field. In pursuit of the withdrawing Union forces, Confederate General John Bell Hood left a burial detail in Franklin for two days. Confederate soldiers were buried near the Carter House breastworks with the graves arranged in plots according to the states from which the soldiers came. As winter wore on, many of the headboards were fading or were used as firewood by the poor. Seeing the great need, John McGavock and family donated two acres of land adjoining the family graveyard, to be used for a final resting place for the soldiers.

In April, 1866, McGavock and other citizens formed a committee and began raising money to remove the bodies. Again, each soldier was laid to rest by state and each known name was registered in the Book of the Dead. John McGavock’s wife, Caroline Winder McGavock continued to maintain the official Register of the Dead and welcome families and comrades of the fallen who wished to pay their respects. At the same time, the John L. McEwen Bivouac of Veterans assisted in maintaining the graves and in 1890 appointed a committee to maintain the cemetery and raise funds to replace the wooden headboards with the markers you see today. In 1911 Mrs. Winder
McGavock Confederate Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, September 13, 2014
2. McGavock Confederate Cemetery Marker
McGavock and Carnton owners, Mr. and Mrs. W.D. Shelton, presented the trustees of the newly chartered McGavock Confederate Cemetery Corporation the deed to the cemetery and the right-of-way thereto. As the noble McEwen veterans passed away, the care of the cemetery devolved upon their wives who were active in the Daughters of the Confederacy, In 1926 the trustees of the corporation voted to authorize the members of Franklin Chapter #14 United Daughters of the Confederacy also to serve. They do so to this date.

Trustees serve today as they did in 1911. The corporation has been designated by the State of Tennessee as the official caretaker of the cemetery. Donations for the 1990-1996 restorations were provided by descendants, Civil War Round Tables, the Franklin and Murfreesboro Re-enactments, Sons of the Confederate Veterans, United Daughters of the Confederacy, local banks and businesses, the City of Franklin, the Tennessee Historical Commission, and interested persons. In 1994 the Franklin Memorial Association received a matching grant from the State of Tennessee and continued to raise funds for repair to the markers, the iron fence, gate and grounds.

A booklet, written by UDC members, on the history of the cemetery, with a list of the soldiers buried here, is available at Carnton and Carter House. We encourage all visitors to remember the fallen soldiers
McGavock Confederate Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 25, 2013
3. McGavock Confederate Cemetery Marker
that gave their lives for their homeland, and we trust all will show proper respect for the dead.

(caption)
1890 Photograph courtesy of the Carter House archives, David Rowland collection
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Sons of Confederate Veterans/United Confederate Veterans, and the United Daughters of the Confederacy marker series.
 
Location. 35° 54.283′ N, 86° 51.7′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker is on Carnton Lane 0.3 miles south of Brandon Drive, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1345 Carnton Lane, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Confederate Cemetery (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named McGavock Confederate Cemetery (a few steps from this marker); Tennessee Association, (within shouting distance of this marker); Carnton Plantation (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named McGavock Confederate Cemetery (about 500 feet away); The Long Road to Recovery (about 600 feet away); A Dream Postponed (about 600 feet away); Confederate Reunions at McGavock's Grove (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Also see . . .
McGavock Confederate Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, September 13, 2014
4. McGavock Confederate Cemetery Marker
This marker, along with markers 69032 & 62914, can be seen in this photo.
 Carnton Plantation & Battlefield. Battle of Franklin Trust. (Submitted on October 6, 2013.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
Confederate Flag raised in the cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 25, 2013
5. Confederate Flag raised in the cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 5, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 350 times since then and 41 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 5, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   2. submitted on September 15, 2014, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama.   3. submitted on October 5, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   4. submitted on September 14, 2014, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama.   5. submitted on October 5, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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