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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Crane in Crane County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Castle Mountain

(2 mi. East)

 
 
Castle Mountain Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, April 16, 2014
1. Castle Mountain Marker
View of roadside park where marker was located, probably somewhere between picnic shelters in foreground and distance.
Inscription. About 3,000 ft. elevation. Since 17th century, a landmark in travel from Texas points to Mexico and California. According to tradition, named by Spaniards for resemblance to ancient castles. Has associations with stories of lost trains of gold and other treasures.
Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1966

 
Erected 1966 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 755.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Comanche Trail into Mexico marker series.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 31° 17.523′ N, 102° 20.935′ W. Marker was in Crane, Texas, in Crane County. Marker was on U.S. 385 7.2 miles south of 6th Street, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Crane TX 79731, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within 14 miles of this location, measured as the crow flies. Juan Cordona Lake (approx. 7.3 miles away); William Carey Crane (approx. 7.3 miles away); Horse Head Crossing on the Pecos River (approx. 8.8 miles away); Horsehead Crossing, C.S.A. (approx. 13.5 miles away).
 
More about this marker. State of Texas records directions to
Castle Mountain Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, April 16, 2014
2. Castle Mountain Marker
Another view of roadside park showing where missing marker was probably located.
marker as: "From Crane, 8 miles S. on US 385 to Roadside Park (marker was in Crane County)", i.e., apparently the state is aware the marker is missing.
 
Also see . . .  Castle Gap. Handbook of Texas Online (Submitted on April 28, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 
 
Additional comments.
1.
Rather than "Castle Mountain", this location is often referenced in terms of the pass through the mountain, i.e. "Castle Gap". One of the best sources of information for Castle Gap is Patrick Dearen's "Castle Gap and the Pecos Frontier", Fort Worth: Texas Christian UP, 1988.
    — Submitted April 28, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.

2. Comanche Trail
Castle Gap was on a branch of the Comanche Trail. Traveling south to Mexico, from Castle Gap, the trail proceeded to Horsehead Crossing of the Pecos River, then onto Comanche Springs at what is now Fort Stockton.
    — Submitted April 28, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.

 
Additional keywords. Horsehead Crossing, Comanche War Trail, Juan Cordona Lake
 
Categories. Hispanic AmericansNative AmericansRoads & Vehicles
 
Castle Mountain image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, April 16, 2014
3. Castle Mountain
View of Castle Mountain in distance, behind picnic shelter.
Castle Mountain image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, April 16, 2014
4. Castle Mountain
Castle Mountain, and the Castle Gap from Castle Gap Road (road ends at private property).
Castle Gap image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, April 16, 2014
5. Castle Gap
Closeup of Castle Gap showing the actual small canyon -- shaped like a V in hills -- through which travelers passed. High resolution photo; Click to get closeup view.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 28, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 492 times since then and 65 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on April 28, 2014, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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