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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lynchburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Site of Dr. Johnson's Tennis Court

 
 
Site of Dr. Johnson's Tennis Court Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, May 26, 2014
1. Site of Dr. Johnson's Tennis Court Marker
Inscription. During the 1940's through early 1960's Dr. R. Walter Johnson trained aspiring, black, tennis hopefuls on this site. Among these were Althea Gibson & Arthur Ashe.
 
Erected 1986 by Lynchburg Chapter of the Links, Inc.
 
Location. 37° 24.187′ N, 79° 9.051′ W. Marker is in Lynchburg, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of Pierce Street and 15th Street, on the right when traveling north on Pierce Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1422 Pierce Street, Lynchburg VA 24501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dr. Robert Walter Johnson (here, next to this marker); Dr. Robert Walter Johnson House and Tennis Court (a few steps from this marker); Professor Frank Trigg (a few steps from this marker); The Anne Spencer House (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Chauncey E. Spencer, Sr. (about 500 feet away); Pauline Weeden Maloney (about 500 feet away); Amelia Perry Pride’s Dorchester Home (about 500 feet away); C.W. Seay (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lynchburg.
 
Also see . . .  Dr. Robert Walter Johnson House and Tennis Court (pdf file). National Register
Site of Dr. Johnson's Tennis Court image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, May 26, 2014
2. Site of Dr. Johnson's Tennis Court
of Historic Places Registration Form. (Submitted on September 16, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsSports
 
Althea Gibson, 1927-2003 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 25, 2017
3. Althea Gibson, 1927-2003
This 1957 watercolor portrait of Althea Gibson by Boris Chaliapin, for the cover of Time Magazine, hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“In 1955, Althea Gibson contemplated retiring from competitive tennis. Had she done so, she would have denied herself her greatest moment. Two years later, this ‘lanky jumping jack of a girl,’ who had begun her sports career playing paddle tennis in New York's Harlem, was arriving home from England, the winner of the women's singles and doubles titles at the prestigious Wimbledon championships. Within another two months, she had won the U.S. women's singles crown at Forest Hills, New York, and emerged triumphant as America's clay court champion as well. ‘Althea Gibson,’ reported Time magazine in its cover story for August 26, 1957, ‘is not the most graceful figure on the courts, and her game is not stylish.&rsqou; Nevertheless, it was clear that at thirty an age when most tennis players lose their competitive edge she was only then hitting her stride.” -- National Portrait Gallery
Arthur Ashe, 1943-1993 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 25, 2017
4. Arthur Ashe, 1943-1993
This 1993 portrait of Arthur Ashe (1943-1993) by Louis Briel hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Armed with superb natural talent, a keen competitive spirit, and poise that set him apart from his rivals, Arthur Ashe made his way from the segregated playground courts of his youth to the pinnacle of the tennis world. Rated among the world's top ten players while still in college, Ashe reached the number-one ranking in spectacular fashion in 1968. After capturing the U.S. amateur title, he served an astonishing twenty-six aces in the final to become the first African American man to claim the U.S. Open championship. Ashe went on to record multiple tournament victories, including his memorable triumph over Jimmy Connors at Wimbledon in 1975. Following a heart attack that forced his retirement in 1980, Ashe dedicated his energies to humanitarian causes. He became a leader in the fight against AIDS in 1992, after revealing that he had contracted the virus through a transfusion.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 21, 2017. This page originally submitted on May 27, 2014, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 485 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 27, 2014, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on September 19, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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