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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Montgomery in Montgomery County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Alabama's First Capitals / The Alabama State Capitol

 
 
Alabama's First Capitals / The Alabama State Capitol Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, July 8, 2011
1. Alabama's First Capitals / The Alabama State Capitol Marker
Inscription. Alabama's First Capitals
On March 3, 1817, Congress designated the town of St. Stephens on the Tombigbee River north of Mobile as capital of the newly formed Alabama Territory. There in 1818, the territorial legislature named Huntsville as the temporary seat of government and Cahawba (near present-day Selma) as the first permanent capital. The constitutional convention and legislature met in Huntsville and on December 14, 1819, Alabama was admitted into the Union. Meanwhile a suitable building was erected at Cahawba. Cahawba was prone to flooding which resulted in another change of locale in 1826-this time to Tuscaloosa. An elegant statehouse erected there served until 1846 when Montgomery became the capital of the state.
The Alabama State Capitol
Anticipating that Montgomery might some day be Alabama's capital, city founder Andrew Dexter in 1819 set aside "Goat Hill," at what was then the eastern edge of a small frontier town, as the locale for a future statehouse. The first capitol on this site was erected in 1846-47 after a design by Philadelphia architect Stephen Decatur Button. Burned only two years later in 1849, this Greek Revival-style structure was replaced by the present capitol, also in the Greek Revival-style, in 1850-51. Additions since that time include a large rear wing (1885),
Alabama's First Capitals / The Alabama State Capitol Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, July 8, 2011
2. Alabama's First Capitals / The Alabama State Capitol Marker
side wing (1908-1912), and another rear addition completed in 1992. In February 1861, delegates from seceding southern states convened in this building to organize the Confederate States of America. On March 25, 1965, the Selma-to-Montgomery civil rights march led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ended on the capitol steps.
 
Erected 1995 by Alabama Historical Association, Montgomery Area Chamber of Commerce, Historical Preservation and Promotion Foundation.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Liberty Bell Replica, and the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 32° 22.677′ N, 86° 18.048′ W. Marker is in Montgomery, Alabama, in Montgomery County. Marker is at the intersection of South Bainbridge Street and Dexter Avenue, on the right when traveling north on South Bainbridge Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Montgomery AL 36104, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Jefferson Davis (a few steps from this marker); Alabama State Capitol (a few steps from this marker); Selma-to-Montgomery March (within shouting distance of this marker); "Battle Flag of the Confederacy" (within shouting distance
Marker is to the left of the Capitol steps in this view. image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, October 1, 2010
3. Marker is to the left of the Capitol steps in this view.
of this marker); "Third National Confederate Flag" (within shouting distance of this marker); John Allan Wyeth (within shouting distance of this marker); Alabama Confederate Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Albert L. Patterson (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Montgomery.
 
Also see . . .
1. Alabama Constitution Village. (Submitted on December 5, 2009, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
2. A Pictorial History of the Alabama State Capitol. (Submitted on December 5, 2009, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
3. Site of Alabama's First Statehouse. (Submitted on December 5, 2009, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Civil RightsSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
Alabama's State Capitol in Montgomery image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, August 1, 2009
4. Alabama's State Capitol in Montgomery
South and East Wing view of the State Capitol. image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, August 1, 2009
5. South and East Wing view of the State Capitol.
North Wing View of the State Capitol. image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, August 1, 2009
6. North Wing View of the State Capitol.
National Historic Landmark plaque to the right of the west entrance doors. image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, October 1, 2010
7. National Historic Landmark plaque to the right of the west entrance doors.
Replica of Contitution Hall image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, June 27, 2009
8. Replica of Contitution Hall
Located on the Site of Alabama's First Constitutional Convention July 5, 1819. Huntsville, Alabama.
Site of Alabama's First Statehouse 1820-1825 image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, August 15, 2009
9. Site of Alabama's First Statehouse 1820-1825
This structure collapsed in 1823 and its fallen remains were reportedly heaped into a railroad embankment. Consequently,we have no picture of the Statehouse that was drawn by someone who actually saw the building. Any modern picture you see of this structure is pure conjecture.
We can only hope that archaeologists will uncover important clues to the appearance of Cahawba's Statehouse.
Relief View of the Alabama's Second Statehouse. image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, July 4, 2006
10. Relief View of the Alabama's Second Statehouse.
Site and Ruins of Alabama's Second Statehouse 1826-1846 in Tuscaloosa image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, July 4, 2006
11. Site and Ruins of Alabama's Second Statehouse 1826-1846 in Tuscaloosa
After the seat of government was moved to Montgomery in 1847, the Tuscaloosa Capitol and its furnishings were deeded to the University of Alabama to be used for educational purposes.
In 1857, the University Board of Trustees leased the building for ninety-nine years to the newly formed Baptist-affiliated Alabama Central Female College. At this time, a large brick four story dormitory was constructed at the west of the building.
On August 22, 1923, the historic building was totally destroyed by fire. In the 1930, the site was cleared for use as a park.
Liberty Bell Replica image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, April 5, 2014
12. Liberty Bell Replica
In 1950 the Secretary of the Treasury gave each state and territory a replica of the Liberty Bell in appreciation of their participation in the Savings Bond drive. The original plaque has been removed. This bell is located on the Washington Street side of the State Capitol.
Alabama State Capitol south image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 25, 2013
13. Alabama State Capitol south
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 5, 2009, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 2,371 times since then and 88 times this year. Last updated on July 24, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 15, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   3. submitted on October 6, 2010, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama.   4, 5, 6. submitted on December 5, 2009, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   7. submitted on October 4, 2010, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama.   8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on December 5, 2009, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   12. submitted on April 16, 2014, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   13. submitted on October 9, 2013, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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