Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fort Laramie in Goshen County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Mary Elizabeth Homsley

 
 
Mary Elizabeth Homsley Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 9, 2016
1. Mary Elizabeth Homsley Marker
Inscription. Mary Elizabeth Homsley was born near Lexington, Kentucky, July 20, 1824. She move with her parents, Jacob and Sarah Oden, to Truxton, Missouri, where she was married to Benjamin Franklin Homsley in 1841. In April 1852, accompanied by Mary's parents and ten brothers and sisters, some with families of their own, they took the trail to Oregon. Mary and Benjamin went with their two daughters, Lura and Sarah Ellen, but left behind in Missouri were the graves of their two oldest children, twins, who had been poisoned by an embittered slave.
The Homsley company traveled to Council Bluff. Somewhere in Nebraska Mary gave birth to their fifth child. Before arriving at Fort Laramie Mary and the baby boy were stricken with measles, and the company elected to cross at the fort, perhaps in search of medical aid. The crossing was a disaster. The wagon carrying Mary overturned and she and the baby were thrown into the river. Both were rescued, but Mary's condition worsened that night and on the following day, June 10, she died. She was wrapped in a featherbed and buried here. The baby survived for several weeks, but he, too, passed away when the company was near present Boise, Idaho.
The company went on to Oregon, where Benjamin took a donation land claim on Elliott Prairie, Clackamas County. He raised his two surviving children alone and
Mary Elizabeth Homsley Grave and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 9, 2016
2. Mary Elizabeth Homsley Grave and Marker
never remarried. He died in 1908 and is buried in Rock Creek Cemetery in Clackamas County.
Mary Homsley's grave was rediscovered in 1925 by passing cowboys. The headstone was enclosed in the present monument the following year. Contacted in Oregon, Lura Homsley Gibson could still vividly recall her mother's death and standing at a lonely grave saying a final good-bye, nearly seventy-five years before.
 
Erected 1991 by Oregon-California Trails Association.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Oregon Trail marker series.
 
Location. 42° 13.326′ N, 104° 33.984′ W. Marker is near Fort Laramie, Wyoming, in Goshen County. Marker can be reached from Road 92 (County Route 50) near Gray Rocks Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Laramie WY 82212, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Journey West Continues (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Greatest Ride in History (approx. 0.9 miles away); ‘Where’s the Wall?’ (approx. 1.2 miles away); Noncommissioned Officers’ Quarters (approx. 1.2 miles away); The Cavalry Stables
The original headstone enclosed in the 1926 monument. image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 9, 2016
3. The original headstone enclosed in the 1926 monument.
(approx. 1.2 miles away); The Rustic Hotel “ . . . No Second-Rate Affair” (approx. 1.2 miles away); The Rustic Hotel (approx. 1.2 miles away); The Post Hospital (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Laramie.
 
More about this marker. The Homsley burial site is to the north (right) of Road 92. Follow the signs.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
Mary Elizabeth Homsley grave site. image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 9, 2016
4. Mary Elizabeth Homsley grave site.
The inscription reads:
A Pioneer Mother of
the Oregon Trail
Mary E. Homsley
1823 - 1852
Mary Elizabeth Homsley burial site image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 9, 2016
5. Mary Elizabeth Homsley burial site
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 2, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 2, 2016, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 119 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on October 2, 2016, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
Paid Advertisement