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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Tenleytown Heritage Trail Historical Markers

This series is for historical markers put out by Tourism DC that make up the Tenleytown Heritage Trail.
 
A Spirit of Community Marker image, Touch for more information
By Tom Fuchs, August 31, 2013
A Spirit of Community Marker
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 12 — A Spirit of CommunityTop of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail
Episcopalians first gathered here to worship in 1874, when St. Alban's Church, located on Wisconsin Avenue and Massachusetts, started a mission for the area. In good weather, services took place under a majestic oak tree on land donated by . . . — Map (db m130927) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 17 — American UniversityTop of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail
Beyond Ward Circle to your left is the campus of American University, chartered by Congress in 1893. Methodist Bishop John Fletcher Hurst guided the university’s development as a center for training future public servants. With its schools in . . . — Map (db m130932) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 1 — Beer, Popcorn, and Penny CandyTop of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail
Suburban shopping arrived in Tenleytown when Sears, Roebuck & Co. erected a Moderne style store here in 1941. The sleek façade demonstrated the latest in department store design. Sears was the second Tenleytown business — after Giant . . . — Map (db m130918) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 15 — For the ChildrenTop of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail
From 1927 until the late 1950s, the landscaped grounds across the street were the Hillcrest Children’s Center. It was founded downtown in 1814 as the Washington City Orphan Asylum by Marcia Burnes Van Ness and President Madison’s wife Dolley. . . . — Map (db m130930) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 7 — In Touch with the WorldTop of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail
“Tenley Tower,” behind you, dates from the mid-1940s. Western Union Telegraph Co. built it as part of an experimental system using microwaves to transmit telegrams in the mid-Atlantic region. This new technology helped erase . . . — Map (db m130925) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 18 — Live on Our Stage!Top of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail
When NBC radio and television and its local affiliate, WRC, moved to these new headquarters in 1958, the average TV screen measured 12 inches. The facility opened with six studios—three TV and three radio. Soon history happened here. . . . — Map (db m47866) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 14 — On the CircleTop of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail
In the 1930s city engineers created Tenley Circle where commuters heading cross-town or downtown changed streetcars. Across the street and to the left of Tenley Circle, a surviving strip of historic Grant Road meets Wisconsin Avenue. In the . . . — Map (db m130929) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 10 — Set in StoneTop of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Heritage Trail
You are standing on the west side of Mt. Airy, a subdivision spanning Wisconsin Avenue laid out in the late 1890s. Mt. Airy evolved into a dense, working-class neighborhood, where policemen and dairymen lived in modest houses. Among them . . . — Map (db m130926) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 13 — To the RescueTop of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail
The brick building across the street opened in 1928 as the Convent of Bon Secours (literally, “good help”). The convent’s sisters had arrived in Baltimore from France in 1881. In Baltimore they quietly nursed both wealthy and needy . . . — Map (db m130928) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — 16 — Winning the WarTop of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail
The U.S. Navy arrived across the street at 3801 Nebraska Avenue during World War II, taking the Colonial style red-brick campus of Mount Vernon Seminary for secret “essential wartime activities.” Soon more than 5,000 workers . . . — Map (db m130931) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Tenleytown — 2 — A Country RoadTop of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail
Step back into the 19th century with a walk down Grant Road, ahead and to your left. This winding byway recalls Tenleytown’s farming past. In fact Grant Road’s undisturbed quality earned it National Historic District and DC Historic District . . . — Map (db m130920) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Tenleytown — 5 — Fort RenoTop of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail
To your right is "Point Reno," the highest point in Washington -- 409 feet above sea level, to be exact. This unsurpassed vantage brought the Civil War (1861-1865) to Tenleytown. After the Union defeat at Bull Run in July 1861, northern . . . — Map (db m130923) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Tenleytown — 6 — Reno CityTop of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail
Before the Civil War (1861-65), the land behind you was part of the 72-acre farm of Giles Dyer. As a Southerner, Dyer depended on enslaved people to work his fields. Because of its elevation, Dyers land was taken by the Union Army in 1861 . . . — Map (db m130924) HM WM
District of Columbia (Washington), Wakefield — 3 — Suburban StyleTop of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail
Until 1890 Tenleytown was a rural crossroads. Then the electric streetcar arrived, followed by the Permanent Highway Plan. Real estate men promoted new houses at the top of the town: city conveniences, country charm, and great views, with a . . . — Map (db m130921) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Wakefield — 4 — Three R'sTop of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail
The red-brick School ahead and to your left is Alice Deal Junior High, honoring the mathematics teacher and union leader who launched Washington’s first junior high school in 1919 at Seventh and O Streets, NW. Architect Albert Harris’s Colonial . . . — Map (db m130922) HM

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