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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Carter Farm

Slavery

 
 
The Carter Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 16, 2019
1. The Carter Farm Marker
Inscription.  Of the more than 12,000 enslaved people who lived in Williamson County in 1860, Fountain Branch Carter owned 28. Carter family records contain many of their names: Prescyt, Harriet, Jack, Calphurnia, Petrenella, Clara, Charlie, Frank, Susie, Oscar, Dilsey, Nancy, Caroline, Eliza, Allen, Rachel, Horace, Mary, Sarah, Sophia, Abow and Tom. These people, with personalities, talents, and skills, lived and worked on the farm and helped it to prosper. They, their parents, and grandparents had been born into the bonds of slavery, but suddenly, as a result of the Civil War, they were free. Freedom was but the first step in the long-fought struggle for equality.

Almost 300 African American men from Williamson County enlisted in the U.S. Colored Troops (USCT) and fought for their own freedom. USCTs did not fight at Franklin, but those who fought at the battle of Nashville in Mid-December 1864 were commended for their valor.

Men and women who had once been enslaved created a new society in a world turned upside down after the war. They learned the value of their skills and labor, learned to make contracts, and established their own
The Carter Farm Marker site image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 16, 2019
2. The Carter Farm Marker site
The marker is second to the left at the Cotton Gin Park.
family and community structures. They created schools, built churches, and made progress. African American neighborhoods that flourished in Franklin included the Natchez Street community near the Carter House and nearby Hard Bargain. From the backyard of his Natchez Street home, freedman Oscar Carter cooked and sold barbeque on the weekends. Proverbial survivors like him lived long lives and helped build the town’s African American community.
 
Erected by Historic Franklin Parks.
 
Location. 35° 54.976′ N, 86° 52.39′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker is at the intersection of Columbia Avenue (Business U.S. 31) and Strahl Street, on the right when traveling north on Columbia Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Carter Gin Site and Park, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Carter Farm (here, next to this marker); Main Entrenchment Federal Battle Line (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 16, 2019
3. Inset
Shorter Chapel, African Methodist Episcopal Church
(within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Categories. African AmericansAgricultureParks & Recreational AreasWar, US Civil
 
Battle of Nashville image. Click for full size.
By Kurz & Allison, circa 1891
4. Battle of Nashville
Library of Congress [LC-DIG-pga-01886]
USCT soldier and family image. Click for full size.
circa 1865
5. USCT soldier and family
Library of Congress [LC-DIG-ppmsca-26454]
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 16, 2019
6. Inset
Nancy Vestal
 

More. Search the internet for The Carter Farm.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 12, 2019. This page originally submitted on September 6, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 40 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 6, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.   4, 5. submitted on September 7, 2019.   6. submitted on September 6, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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