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Darien in McIntosh County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Darien

 
 
Darien Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, August 2008
1. Darien Marker
Inscription.  This is Darien, in the heart of the historic Altamaha delta region. Settled in 1736, by Scottish Highlanders under John McIntosh Mohr, it was named for the ill-fated settlement on the Isthmus of Panama. The first military parade in Georgia was held in Darien, February 22, 1736, when Gen. James Edward Oglethorpe reviewed the Highland Company in full regalia, with claymores, side arms and targes. The Highland Company supported Oglethorpe in all his campaigns, and won everlasting fame on the field of Bloody Marsh. During the Revolution, Darien men again came to the front -- Gen. Lachlan McIntosh, Col. Wm. McIntosh and Col. John McIntosh were among the heroes of that War. In 1818 the City of Darien was chartered, and became the County Seat. The Bank of Darien, chartered in 1818, was the strongest Bank south of Philadelphia, with branches in 7 Georgia cities. Huge mills sawed into lumber millions of feet of timber rafted down the river. Darien was one of the great ports of the Eastern Seaboard. It was burned in 1863 by northern troops stationed on St. Simons`s Island. Rebuilt in the 1870s, Darien again became a great port, and the mills sawed lumber
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to be shipped all over the world. Depletion of the forests brought this era to an end in the early 1900s.
 
Erected 1957 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 095-30.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraIndustry & CommerceNotable PlacesSettlements & SettlersWar, US CivilWar, US RevolutionaryWaterways & Vessels. In addition, it is included in the Georgia Historical Society series list. A significant historical date for this entry is February 22, 1864.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 31° 22.102′ N, 81° 26.116′ W. Marker was in Darien, Georgia, in McIntosh County. Marker was at the intersection of Ocean Highway (U.S. 17) and Fort King George Road (State Highway 25), on the left when traveling south on Ocean Highway. Marker is adjacent to the Altamaha River bridge. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Darien GA 31305, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Fort King George (here, next to this marker); Port of Darien (a few steps from this marker); Fort Darien (a few steps from this marker); Darien Waterfront (within shouting distance of this
Darien Marker, along US 17, in backround image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, 2008
2. Darien Marker, along US 17, in backround
marker); The Burning of Darien (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Methodists at Darien (about 500 feet away); McIntosh County (about 700 feet away); Oglethorpe Oak (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Darien.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia entry for Darien, GA. Fort King George (Georgia's oldest fort) was built in 1721, near what would become Darien. At the time it was the southern-most outpost of the British Empire in North America. The fort was abandoned in 1727 following attacks from the Spanish. (Submitted on August 18, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional commentary.
1. Marker is missing
Not even the post. Picture here indicates that it was next to the Fort King George 1 mi. sign. Not there anymore.
    — Submitted August 15, 2019, by Brian orland of Athens, Georgia.
 
Darien Marker, shares location with Fort King George Historical Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Stroud, 2011
3. Darien Marker, shares location with Fort King George Historical Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 13, 2019. It was originally submitted on August 18, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,550 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 18, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3. submitted on September 20, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.

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Feb. 21, 2024