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Near Chrisman in Edgar County, Illinois — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Pontiac Peace Treaty

 
 
Pontiac Peace Treaty Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By John Desaulniers, Jr., March 16, 2010
1. Pontiac Peace Treaty Marker
Inscription.  A few miles west of here on July 18, 1765, Pontiac, an Ottawa Chief, and George Croghan, British Representative, met in a formal peace council which ended the most threatening Indian uprising against the British in North America. Following the French and Indian War (1754 - 1763), many Indian tribes showed dissatisfaction with British rule. Indian leaders believed the land belonged to the Indians and that the French and British occupied it only by their consent, but the British had no intention of accepting Indian tribes as independent national units possessing sovereignty. This disagreement and others concerning liquor, ammunition, and other gifts led to open hostilities.

On May 3, 1763, Pontiac led the Ottawa and other tribes in an attack of Fort Detroit. Additional tribes attacked other forts. Soon the frontier was the scene of an extensive Indian uprising. By August, only Detroit, Fort Pitt, and Fort Niagara remained in British hands. Pontiac held his followers to a six months siege of Detroit which was remarkable as warriors preferred active combat. Contemporary estimates of the number killed or captured by the Indians ran as
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high as 2,000, but the actual figure was closer to 600.

The siege failed and Pontiac traveled west to seek French aid. When this was refused, Pontiac agreed to meet the English Representative George Crogahn. Following this meeting, Pontiac accompanied Croghan to Detroit where they arrived on August 17, 1765, to finalize the treaty with appropriate ceremonies.

Pontiac was assassinated in Cahokia, Illinois, in April 1769 by a Peoria Indian.
 
Erected 1989 by Illinois Department of Transportation, Illinois State Historical Society.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraForts and CastlesNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWar, French and Indian. In addition, it is included in the Illinois State Historical Society series list. A significant historical month for this entry is April 1769.
 
Location. 39° 50.465′ N, 87° 39.884′ W. Marker is near Chrisman, Illinois, in Edgar County. Marker is on U.S. 150, 0.3 miles north of County Route 2500N, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Chrisman IL 61924, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Abraham Lincoln - Eighth Judicial District (approx. 2.8 miles away); Dedicated to All Veterans (approx. 3.7 miles
Pontiac Peace Treaty Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Al Wolf, August 31, 2008
2. Pontiac Peace Treaty Marker
away); The Treaty Between Harrison and the Indians (approx. 4.4 miles away); One of The Original Milestones (# 97) (approx. 5.1 miles away); Thy Wonderous Story, Illinois (approx. 6.8 miles away); Veterans Honor Roll (approx. 7.2 miles away); One of The Original Milestones (# 93) (approx. 9.2 miles away); Detroit - Kaskaskia Indian Trail (approx. 9.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chrisman.
 
Marker on West Side at a Rest Area image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Al Wolf, August 31, 2008
3. Marker on West Side at a Rest Area
View looking North up U.S. 150 highway. Marker is under tree in the rest area.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 17, 2019. It was originally submitted on September 2, 2008, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana. This page has been viewed 3,607 times since then and 55 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on May 6, 2010, by John Desaulniers, Jr. of Mingo, Iowa.   2, 3. submitted on September 2, 2008, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.

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Feb. 21, 2024