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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Los Angeles in Los Angeles County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Zanja Madre

 
 
Zanja Madre Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Baker, February 6, 2018
1. Zanja Madre Marker
Inscription.  Through this spot flowed the Zanja Madre (Mother Ditch) which channeled the waters of the Los Angeles River to the citizens of Los Angeles for 123 years, 1781-1904.
 
Erected 1952 by Dept. of Water & Power, City of Los Angeles.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraHispanic AmericansNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 34° 3.461′ N, 118° 14.263′ W. Marker is in Los Angeles, California, in Los Angeles County. Marker can be reached from Olvera Street south of Cesar E Chavez Avenue, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4 Olvera St # C, Los Angeles CA 90012, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Pure Water from Many Sources (here, next to this marker); Pelanconi House (a few steps from this marker); Charlie Chaplin’s The Kid (a few steps from this marker); Old Winery (within shouting distance of this marker); Sepulveda House (within shouting distance
Zanja Madre Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Baker, February 6, 2018
2. Zanja Madre Marker
Bricks are installed in a zig-zag pattern to show the original Zanja Madre route.
Click or scan to see
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of this marker); Headquarters of Commander Robert Field Stockton (within shouting distance of this marker); Pelanconi Warehouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Hammel Building (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Los Angeles.
 
Regarding Zanja Madre. The Zanja Madre was the original earthen-walled ditch that carried water to the plaza of El Pueblo de Los Angeles. The Spanish-Colonial settlers and local Native Americans constructed it. The system of ditches grew to nearly 50 miles in length, later being enclosed in brick to improve sanitation and reduce evaporation. By the early 1900s, Los Angeles had outgrown its zanjas, and began importing water from the Owens Valley.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 21, 2020. It was originally submitted on May 4, 2019, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. This page has been viewed 171 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 4, 2019, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.

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May. 20, 2022