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Fort Recovery in Mercer County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Role of Women in the Battle

 
 
The Role of Women in the Battle Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
1. The Role of Women in the Battle Marker
Inscription.  Imagine the scene that unfolded here on the frigid evening of November 3, 1791. St. Clair's main encampment of about 900 people was set up in a rectangle on this high ground with the Wabash River to the west, squeezed in by Buck Run to the south, and bounded by the curve in the Wabash River to the north. Inside the two lines of camp were campfires tended by women camp followers, most often wives of the soldiers, who were responsible for cooking and cleaning. The area would have been bustling with 250 women and children, gathering firewood, tending the fires, and cooking the evening meal while the rest of camp was set up by St. Clair's men. The 300 Kentucky Militiamen were west across the Wabash River.

In contrast, the 1,400 member American Indian alliance was split into war parties of 20-30 which, after traveling south from Kiihkayonki, had convened a mile or two northwest of here. Historical accounts support that American Indian women participated in the battle, as Kentucky sharpshooter Samuel McDowell recalled years later a conversation with an American Indian woman who recounted her role in the battle with him. The Miami had female
The Role of Women in the Battle Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
2. The Role of Women in the Battle Marker
Close-up view of two illustration that are displayed on this marker. The captions reads as follows: Left: A camp follower of the period dressed in her fallen husband's jacket and hat, while holding her baby. Etching by Daniel Chodowiecki. Right: "My Husband." A federal official once observed a distinctive mourning custom among the Ojibwa. Upon the death of a married man, the widow created a bundle made from his best clothes. For a specified period, usually a year, she called the bundle her husband and respectfully carried it everywhere. The ritual must have become a familiar scene in Ojibwa villages during the Indian Wars.
war leaders who helped organize and supply war parties, but did not normally fight in the battle. Given their typical input into planning war and peace, it seems likely that Miami women's council's opinions were part of the American Indian alliance's decision to attack St. Clair's army on its way to Kiihkayonki. Depending on tribal customs, women from other tribes may have had a role in the Battle of the Wabash.
 
Erected by National Park Service American Battlefield Protection Program and the State of Ohio. (Marker Number 8.)
 
Location. 40° 24.832′ N, 84° 46.794′ W. Marker is in Fort Recovery, Ohio, in Mercer County. Marker is on Fort Site Street south of West Boundary Street, on the left when traveling south. This marker is situated in a municipal public park, along a walking path that connects the Fort Recovery Museum with the downtown business district. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1 Fort Site Street, Fort Recovery OH 45846, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. St. Clair’s Defeat / Wayne’s Victory (a few steps from this marker); The Battle of Fort Recovery (within shouting distance of this marker); The Battle of the Wabash (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to the Fort Recovery Battlefield Walking Tour
The Role of Women in the Battle Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
3. The Role of Women in the Battle Marker
Close-up view of the map that is displayed on this marker. The caption reads as follows:Location of St. Clair's encampment shown over present-day Fort Recovery. GIS Map Credit: Applied Anthropology Laboratories, Ball State University.
(within shouting distance of this marker); The Battle of Fallen Timbers and the Treaty of Greeneville (within shouting distance of this marker); Building Fort Recovery (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Fort Recovery (within shouting distance of this marker); Locating the Fort (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Recovery.
 
Categories. Anthropology & ArchaeologyNative AmericansWars, US IndianWomen
 
The Role of Women in the Battle Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
4. The Role of Women in the Battle Marker
The Role of Women in the Battle Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
5. The Role of Women in the Battle Marker
View, looking east, of the marker, situated along a walkway, in a municipal public park, in the downtown district.
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on August 3, 2019. This page originally submitted on August 3, 2019, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 45 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 3, 2019, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.
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