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Walhalla in Oconee County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Issaqueena Falls

Dramatic Cascades of the Upcountry

 
 
Issaqueena Falls Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
1. Issaqueena Falls Marker
Inscription.  
The Legend
Local stories about thus site involve variations from the poem, "Cateechee of Keowee,' a story of love and adversity penned by J.W. Daniels, A.M., in 1898. The following is a summary of Rev. Daniels' poem, which thrust Issaqueena in immortality.

This beautiful waterfall is named for a Creek maiden called Issaqueena. There are many legends about Issaqueena. The most popular story tells how as a girl Issaqueena was captured by the Cherokee and given the name Cateechee. As a young woman she met and fell in love with a white trader named Allan Francis. One day she overheard a plan by the Cherokee to attack the settlements on the frontier. To warn her lover, she found a swift pony and rode 96 miles to his trading fort. As she traveled, Issaqueena named the landmarks she crossed on her way -- Six mile Mountain, twelve Mile River, Eighteen Mile Creek, and others on her way to her final destination at Fort Ninety-Six.

Fearing retribution from the Cherokees, Issaqueena remained with Allan, eventually marrying him. In time, she, Allan, and their newborn baby moved back to Stumphouse Mountain where they built
Issaqueena Falls Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
2. Issaqueena Falls Marker
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their home.

One day, the Cherokee Chief, angered with the white settlers, sent his warriors to capture Issaqueena. Issaqueena saw them coming and ran toward the waterfall to escape capture. Knowing that the Cherokee believed evil spirits lived in waterfalls, she pretended to leap to her death. She hid on the ledge below the top of the waterfall where she remained until it was safe to rejoin her family. Her dramatic escape began the legend of Issaqueena Falls.
 
Erected by South Carolina Heritage Corridor.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraEnvironmentForts and CastlesNative AmericansWaterways & Vessels. In addition, it is included in the South Carolina Heritage Corridor series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1898.
 
Location. 34° 48.483′ N, 83° 7.219′ W. Marker is in Walhalla, South Carolina, in Oconee County. Marker is on Stumphouse Tunnel Road. Marker is located near the start of the falls. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Walhalla SC 29691, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Issaqueena Falls (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); South Carolina National Heritage Corridor (about 500 feet away); Stumphouse Mountain Tunnel
Wooden Walking Bridge - Leads to the Start of the Falls image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
3. Wooden Walking Bridge - Leads to the Start of the Falls
(approx. Ό mile away); Stumphouse Tunnel (approx. Ό mile away); Andrew Pickens Ranger District / Oconee County (approx. 0.4 miles away); Mountain Rest School / Hillbilly Day (approx. 2½ miles away); Chauga Town (approx. 3.6 miles away); Oconee Town (approx. 3.8 miles away); Oconee Station / Oconee County (approx. 3.9 miles away); Oconee County Confederate Monument (approx. 4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Walhalla.
 
Also see . . .  Issaqueena Falls and Tunnel Falls. Issaqueena Falls has a similar story as Connestee Falls south of Brevard, N.C. (Submitted on December 7, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Issaqueena Falls image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, April 20, 2008
4. Issaqueena Falls
Creek Leading to the Falls image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brian Scott, April 20, 2008
5. Creek Leading to the Falls
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 17, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 7, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,290 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on December 7, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

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Aug. 9, 2022