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Brightwood in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Borden's Dream Realized

Former Walter Reed Army Medical Center

 

— Walking Tour —

 
Borden's Dream Realized Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 20, 2019
1. Borden's Dream Realized Marker
Inscription.  While the hospital continued to emphasize clinical microscopy and bacteriology, achievements in other fields set the standards for military and civilian care in fields such as dentistry and X-ray use. The circumstances of World War I and the high number of orthopedic injuries treated at Walter Reed made the hospital a standout in the field of orthopedic surgery; ensuring achievements in prosthetic development and patient rehabilitation gave the hospital further distinction as a national center for prosthetic fittings, which it still is today.

The hospital's academic focus was reflected in the campus-like organization that expanded as new buildings and institutions were added. By 1923, the Walter Reed campus became the home of the Army Medical School, later known as the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) (shown on map on opposite panel). It was considered the first school of public health and preventive medicine in the world, and epidemiological field studies led by faculty included the investigations of yellow fever by Major Walter Reed. World War II era research topics included dengue fever, malaria, combat stress and
Borden's Dream Realized Marker [Reverse] image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 20, 2019
2. Borden's Dream Realized Marker [Reverse]
wound treatment. In the arena of global medicine, WRAIR developed vaccines to prevent hepatitis A, meningococcal meningitis and adenovirus, and continues to work on malarial treatment and prevention.

The Army Medical Museum was founded in 1862 to collect pathological specimens along with their case histories. Increased emphasis on pathology during the 20th century turned the museum, renamed the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) in 1949, into an international resource for pathology and disease research. In 1955, with the relocation of the AFIP to the campus from downtown Washington, DC, Army medical training, research and patient care were consolidated on one campus for the first time, thus fully realizing Borden's dream.

[Captions:]
By 1932, two wings had been added to the original Army Medical School, constructed in 1923. The campus flagpole had been moved from the Main Hospital to the east entrance of the newly constructed building on the west side of the campus signifying the relocation of the Army Medical Center campus's headquarters.

With the addition of the AFIP to the campus, Walter Reed became home to some of the most cutting-edge technological advancements in identification of disease, development and dissemination of vaccines, and veterinary medicine. A surgical pathologist operates the color television microscope
Borden's Dream Realized Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 20, 2019
3. Borden's Dream Realized Marker
designed by Walter Reed personnel and RCA.

In 1955 the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, formerly the Army Medical Museum, was dedicated on the WRAMC campus. The megalithic concrete building was the first modern building constructed on the campus, a major departure from the predominant Georgian Colonial style of most buildings on the campus. The building housed the irreplaceable National Historic Landmark (NHL)-listed collections (pathological specimens) amassed by the Army Medical Museum since the Civil War.

Constructed during a period of the Cold War era that required certain federal buildings to be blast-resistant, Building 54 was designed to withstand a nuclear bomb blast. The windowless building was designed with detailed concrete panels to provide subtle variations, a relief from a uniform concrete façade.
(Marker Number 4.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 38° 58.465′ N, 77° 1.794′ W. Marker is in Brightwood, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Main Drive Northwest 0.1 miles west of 12th Street Northwest, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20307, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Walter Reed General Hospital (within shouting distance of this marker); Walter Reed Army Medical Center
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(within shouting distance of this marker); Cameron's Creek and the Rose Garden (within shouting distance of this marker); Borden's Dream (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); WRAMC - Modern Era (about 400 feet away); Battle of Fort Stevens (about 500 feet away); Site of a Tulip Tree (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Walter Reed Army Medical Center (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Brightwood.
 
Categories. ArchitectureEducationScience & MedicineWar, ColdWar, US CivilWar, World IWar, World II
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on December 21, 2019. This page originally submitted on December 20, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 42 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 20, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
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