Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Historic District in St. Augustine in St. Johns County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Archaeology at the Nombre de Dios Mission — Nuestra Señora de La Leche Shrine

 
 
Archaeology at the Nombre de Dios Mission — Nuestra Señora de La Leche Shrine Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, December 17, 2019
1. Archaeology at the Nombre de Dios Mission — Nuestra Señora de La Leche Shrine Marker
Inscription.  Archaeological excavations at the Nombre de Dios Mission/Nuestra Señora de La Leche Shrine site have been undertaken by University of Florida archaeologists since 1985. The digs have been carried out in search of the earliest sixteenth century Spanish fortifications of St. Augustine, established in this vicinity by Admiral Pedro Menendez Aviles in 1565. Archaeologists have also been trying to learn more about the Nombre de Dios Mission community.

Spanish Fortifications
Excavations between 1993 and 2001 uncovered part of a sixteenth century moat here, extending from the shoreline toward the west for about 100 feet inland, along the south side of the rustic altar. Near the moat, archaeologists also discovered the stains from two very large wooden columns or pillars, which may have been part of a blockhouse or watchtower. Large spikes, Spanish pottery, beads, and lead musket shot were found in the moat and pillar stains.

Excavations resumed in 2009 to try to uncover more of this building by searching for additional large post stains. The architectural evidence and artifacts associated with them will help determine
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
if they were the remains of the earliest 16th century defenses of St. Augustine.

The Spanish Lime Kiln
A Spanish lime-making kiln was discovered along the shoreline of the excavation area. It was a large pit lined with logs, into which oyster shell was packed and burned to produce lime. Lime was used for mortar, plaster and whitewash. This method of producing lime has been known since Roman times, but the kiln here is the only example reported so far in North America. The lime kiln was used and abandoned in the second half of the sixteenth century.

The Mission
The Nombre de Dios mission was the first Catholic Franciscan mission in the United States, established in 1587 to serve the Native American Timucua people of St. Augustine. It endured for nearly 200 years as a Franciscan mission, until the end of the Spanish period in 1763. Many of the earliest Timucuan converts to Christianity lived at this site.

Archaeologists are trying to learn more about the lifeways and culture of the Timucua people who resided in this mission community. Their pottery, beads, food remains, tools and ornaments tell us a great deal about these original inhabitants of St. Augustine, and the changes that Spanish arrival made to their culture.

(photo captions)
• Venetian glass bead and copper star ornament (16th century)
• Iron spikes
Marker detail: Location of Archaeological Excavations and Features image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: Location of Archaeological Excavations and Features
The Spanish lime kiln, lined by logs
• Ming porcelain found in the lime kiln (second half of the 16th century)
• Artist’s conception of Doña Maris Melendez, the Chieftainess of the Native American community at Nombre de Dios, ca. 1600
• Native American pottery made by St. Augustine Timucua people
 
Erected by Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida, Lastinger Family Foundation, and the Catholic Diocese of St. Augustine.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Anthropology & ArchaeologyChurches & ReligionColonial EraNative Americans.
 
Location. 29° 54.287′ N, 81° 18.884′ W. Marker is in St. Augustine, Florida, in St. Johns County. It is in the Historic District. Marker can be reached from the intersection of San Marco Avenue (Florida Route A1A) and Old Mission Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Marker is located along the walkway at Our Lady of La Leche National Shrine grounds at Mission Nombre de Dios. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 101 San Marco Avenue, Saint Augustine FL 32084, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Nombre de Dios Mission (within shouting distance of this marker); An Archaeological Discovery (within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Shrine of Our Lady of La Leche
Archaeology at the Nombre de Dios Mission — Nuestra Señora de La Leche Shrine Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, December 17, 2019
3. Archaeology at the Nombre de Dios Mission — Nuestra Señora de La Leche Shrine Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Our Lady of La Leche (within shouting distance of this marker); Rustic Altar (within shouting distance of this marker); Archaeology at the 17th Century Shrine of Nuestra Señora de la Leche (within shouting distance of this marker); Msgr. Harold Frederick Jordan (within shouting distance of this marker); Mission Nombre de Dios (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in St. Augustine.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Archaeology at Mission Nombre de Dios
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 12, 2020. It was originally submitted on March 11, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 277 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on March 11, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3. submitted on March 12, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=146513

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Apr. 17, 2024