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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Aspen in Pitkin County, Colorado — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

The Continental Divide

 
 
The Continental Divide Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, July 4, 2020
1. The Continental Divide Marker
Inscription.  The Continental Divide is the topographic line that separates the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean drainages. The Divide in North America runs down the spine of the Rocky Mountains between Alaska and Mexico over the highest points between the drainages. At an elevation of 12,095' above sea level, Highway 82 over Independence Pass is the highest paved road crossing of the Continental Divide in North America. This location also marks the boundary between Lake County and the Pike-San Isabel National Forest to the east, and Pitkin County and the White River National Forest to the west.

Captions:
Top left: Lake Creek The Grizzly Tunnel (right) brings water from the Roaring Fork and Lincoln Creek drainages under the Continental Divide to Lake Creek, the source of Twin Lakes. Changes in flow due to diversions has damaged both Lincoln and Lake Creeks. Photos: Mark Fuller
Bottom left: Roaring Fork River The Roaring Fork River is the second-largest tributary to the Colorado River in the State with some of its flow diverted east under the Continental Divide through the Twin Lakes Diversion
The Continental Divide Marker Detail image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, July 4, 2020
2. The Continental Divide Marker Detail
Lake Creek The Grizzly Tunnel (right) brings water from the Roaring Fork and Lincoln Creek drainages under the Continental Divide to Lake Creek, the source of Twin Lakes. Changes in flow due to diversions has damaged both Lincoln and Lake Creeks. Photos: Mark Fuller
System (photo right: Lost Man Diversion Canal). Photos: Mark Fuller
Middle: The broad reach of the divide The Continental Divide is a geographic designation that runs along the highest points between Alaska and Argentina, separating the Atlantic and the Pacific watersheds. The land in North America west of the Divide drains to the Pacific Ocean while the land east of the Divide drains to the Atlantic Ocean.
Right: The snow fence experiment In the mid-1960s, tons of snowfence were deposited and built around the Pass in an experiment to capture more winter snows and thereby increase water for runoff. The experiment failed and the snowfence was abandoned on the ridges surrounding the Pass. The Independence Pass Foundation led a successful effort to remove the debris which was smothering out tundra plants and had been a hazard to hikers and skiers. Photo: Mark Fuller
 
Erected by The Independent Pass Foundation.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: EnvironmentParks & Recreational Areas.
 
Location. 39° 6.497′ N, 106° 33.835′ W. Marker is near Aspen, Colorado, in Pitkin County. Marker is on Colorado 82, on the left when traveling west. Marker
The Continental Divide Marker Detail image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, July 4, 2020
3. The Continental Divide Marker Detail
Roaring Fork River The Roaring Fork River is the second-largest tributary to the Colorado River in the State with some of its flow diverted east under the Continental Divide through the Twin Lakes Diversion System (photo right: Lost Man Diversion Canal). Photos: Mark Fuller
is approximately 17 miles east of Aspen, on the border of the White River and Pike-San Isabel National Forests. The road is closed October-May. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Almont CO 81210, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Early Travel Over the Pass (here, next to this marker); The Environment (here, next to this marker); Restoring the "Top Cut" (approx. 1.3 miles away); Independence Pass Foundation (approx. 1.3 miles away); Welcome to the Ghost Town of Independence (approx. 2.1 miles away); a different marker also named Welcome to the Ghost Town of Independence (approx. 2.1 miles away); Independence Townsite (approx. 2.1 miles away); Tent City (approx. 2.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Aspen.
 
The Continental Divide Marker Detail image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, July 4, 2020
4. The Continental Divide Marker Detail
The broad reach of the divide The Continental Divide is a geographic designation that runs along the highest points between Alaska and Argentina, separating the Atlantic and the Pacific watersheds. The land in North America west of the Divide drains to the Pacific Ocean while the land east of the Divide drains to the Atlantic Ocean.
The Continental Divide Marker Detail image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, July 4, 2020
5. The Continental Divide Marker Detail
The snow fence experiment In the mid-1960s, tons of snowfence were deposited and built around the Pass in an experiment to capture more winter snows and thereby increase water for runoff. The experiment failed and the snowfence was abandoned on the ridges surrounding the Pass. The Independence Pass Foundation led a successful effort to remove the debris which was smothering out tundra plants and had been a hazard to hikers and skiers. Photo: Mark Fuller
The Continental Divide Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, July 4, 2020
6. The Continental Divide Marker
This marker is in the center.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 17, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 16, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 64 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 16, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 2, 2021