Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Alexandria, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Carlyle House Historic Park

 
 
Carlyle House Historic Park Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones, January 26, 2019
1. Carlyle House Historic Park Marker
Inscription.  
This unique building, constructed of stone and set back from the street, was built by John Carlyle, a British merchant and one of the original founders of Alexandria. Witness to both domestic life and war, today the house stands as a museum dedicated to telling the story of Carlyle's journey from British citizen to American patriot.

Who Was John Carlyle?
John Carlyle first came to America as a merchant's "factor" or agent. While in Virginia, he met and married Sarah Fairfax, a member of the wealthy Fairfax family. As a second son, John Carlyle would have had difficulty becoming prosperous in England, but in the New World, he was quickly able to become a prominent landowner, merchant and town leader. Between 1751 and 1753, John Carlyle built this home using Aquia sandstone. Although this outer layer of stone was replaced, you can see the original material on the cornice, just below the roofline.

What Happened Here?
Only two years after moving in, the Carlyles received an historic visit. General Edward Braddock, sent by the King in England, made the home his headquarters in 1755. On April 13th,
Carlyle House Historic Park Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones, September 19, 2020
2. Carlyle House Historic Park Marker
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five Royal Colonial Governors arrived at the house for what John Carlyle called "the Grandest Congress...ever known on this Continent." Here, Braddock and the Governors discussed their strategy for the French and Indian War, including how they would fund it. It was agreed that Parliament would need to "compel" the colonists to pay by levying taxes, a decision that would one day contribute to the American Revolution.
 
Erected by Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Abolition & Underground RRColonial EraWar, French and Indian. In addition, it is included in the NOVA Parks series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1751.
 
Location. 38° 48.31′ N, 77° 2.535′ W. Marker is in Alexandria, Virginia. Marker is on North Fairfax Street south of Cameron Street, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 117 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria VA 22314, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Braddock Road Mile "0" (here, next to this marker); The Braddock Campaign and Carlyle House (a few steps from this marker); Civil War and Restoration (within shouting distance of this marker); Bank of Alexandria (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Assembly Hall
The Carlyle House image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones, January 26, 2019
3. The Carlyle House
(within shouting distance of this marker); The Garden — Past and Present (within shouting distance of this marker); Wise's Tavern (within shouting distance of this marker); Hall, Bank & Tavern (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Alexandria.
 
Regarding Carlyle House Historic Park.
[portrait photo caption]
Portrait of John Carlyle, by John Hesselius, 1765.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. This marker has replaced the linked marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Carlyle House: National Register of Historic Places inventory, Nomination Form. "Alexandria’s celebrated colonial mansion was completed in 1753 as the home of John Carlyle, a Scottish merchant who was a founding trustee of the city. Influenced by the compact early Georgian manor houses of Scotland, the Carlyle House is built of stone and employs a somewhat austere classicism. In Carlyle’s handsome paneled parlor, Gen. Edward Braddock met with the governors of five colonies in April 1755, to plan the early campaigns against the French and the Indians. Though located in the heart
Carlyle House Historic Park image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, December 6, 2009
4. Carlyle House Historic Park
of the Alexandria Historic District, the house was long hidden by a hotel built across its front. Demolition of the hotel and restoration of the house as a museum were undertaken as a bicentennial project by the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority." (Submitted on June 27, 2021.) 

2. Carlyle House Historic Park. "Discover Carlyle House Historic Park, home to an eighteenth-century historic house museum in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia. John Carlyle, a wealthy merchant and a founder of Alexandria, completed his elegant stone mansion in 1753. Today, Carlyle House is one of the nation’s finest examples of Georgian residential architecture." (Submitted on June 27, 2021.) 
 
J. S. C.<br>1752 image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, December 6, 2009
5. J. S. C.
1752
Fan light and inscription over the door at Carlyle House.
Additional plaque on the brick wall internal to the yard image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones, January 26, 2019
6. Additional plaque on the brick wall internal to the yard
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 28, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 26, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 244 times since then and 30 times this year. Last updated on September 20, 2020, by Carl Gordon Moore Jr. of North East, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on January 26, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   2. submitted on September 19, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   3. submitted on January 26, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   4, 5. submitted on April 15, 2021, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   6. submitted on January 26, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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May. 21, 2022