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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Ramah in Cibola County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Visitors Through the Ages

El Morro National Monument

 
 
Visitors Through the Ages Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 20, 2016
1. Visitors Through the Ages Marker
Inscription.  From the early Puebloan people who built their homes atop this rock, to the many explorers and adventurers who carved their names, to modern visitors who travel here looking for the evidence of those who came before, El Morro reflects the history of the Southwest in a way that books cannot do.

Here you may peer into the lives of the first inhabitants, stand in the footsteps of Spanish conquistadores and soldiers, and rest at the edge of the same hidden pool where American emigrants, explorers, and other travelers were invigorated during their long and dusty journeys.

1275-1400
Ancestral Puebloan people live in villages on top of the sandstone rock. Some of the rooms of these villages are visible today, as well as hundreds of petroglyphs carved into the face of the rock.

1539-1774
Lured by tales of golden cities, the Spanish begin numerous expeditions into what is now New Mexico. The first Spanish inscription carved at El Morro is that of Governor Don Juan de Onate in 1605; the last is dated 1774.

1846-1906
United States Military expeditions come to the area, followed by emigrants en route
Visitors Through the Ages Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 20, 2016
2. Visitors Through the Ages Marker
(El Morro in background)
to California. Many of these Americans’ names are carved on the rock during this period.

1906-Present
El Morro is preserved as a national monument. Today, people travel here along some of the same routes that have been followed for hundreds of years.

1906: A Monumental Year
On December 8, 1906 President Theodore Roosevelt proclaimed El Morro a national monument under the Antiquities Act of 1906. In doing so, he ensured that the inscriptions, petroglyphs, and pueblo ruins would be preserved for generations to come.

And whereas, the rocks known as El Morro and Inscription Rock in the Territory of New Mexico, situated upon public lands owned by the United States, are of the greatest historical value and it appears that the public good would be promoted by setting aside said rocks as a national monument with as much land as may be necessary for the proper protection thereof...
President Theodore Roosevelt
December 8, 1906


The Antiquities Act, signed by Roosevelt in June of 1906, made it possible for Presidents to proclaim "historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or scientific interest" as national monuments.

In all, Roosevelt created 18 national monuments, including three others designated in 1906 — Devil's Tower, Montezuma Castle and Petrified Forest. These earliest
One of Many Spanish Expedition-era El Morro Inscriptions image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 20, 2016
3. One of Many Spanish Expedition-era El Morro Inscriptions
national monuments continue to delight us more than one hundred years later.
 
Erected by National Parks Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Anthropology & ArchaeologyExplorationNative AmericansParks & Recreational Areas. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #26 Theodore Roosevelt series list.
 
Location. 35° 2.248′ N, 108° 20.557′ W. Marker is near Ramah, New Mexico, in Cibola County. Marker is on El Morro National Monument Road 0.6 miles south of Ice Caves Road (State Highway 53), on the right when traveling south. Marker is located inside El Morro National Monument, in a pull-out on the northwest side of the road overlooking the namesake El Morro bluff in the distance. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Ramah NM 87321, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Monumental Changes (approx. 0.4 miles away); Welcome to El Morro (approx. 0.4 miles away); Preserving Our Heritage (approx. half a mile away); El Morro National Monument Inscription Rock (approx. half a mile away); Oasis (approx. half a mile away); Lemonade Sumac
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(approx. half a mile away); Atsinna (approx. 0.6 miles away); Matilda Coxe Stevenson (1849-1915) (approx. 2˝ miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ramah.
 
Regarding Visitors Through the Ages. National Register of Historic Places #66000043.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. El Morro National Monument
 
Also see . . .
1. El Morro National Monument: The Puebloans. The Zuni (A:shiwi), whose ancestors built pueblos atop El Morro, call the great sandstone promontory Atsinna, or "place of writings on the rock." The symbols and pictures the Puebloans left behind may communicate both the mundane and the spiritual. Eventually, new groups of travelers took inspiration from the Puebloan scribes. With points of steel, they continued the story in records of attempted conquest and colonization. (Submitted on December 23, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. El Morro National Monument (Wikipedia). With its oasis-like source of water, El Morro served as a stopping place for numerous travelers through the otherwise arid and desolate region, many of whom left signatures, names, dates, and stories of
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their treks in the walls of the sandstone cliff. While some of the inscriptions are fading, there are still many that can be seen today, with some dating to the 17th century. (Submitted on December 23, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. El Morro National Monument. Over 2,000 drawings, signatures and messages have been inscribed in the soft sandstone cliffs (known as Inscription Rock) beside the pool, from three distinct periods - Ancestral Puebloans of up to 1,000 years ago, Spanish conquistadors from 1605 to around 1800, and American settlers after this time. A paved, half mile trail leads to the inscriptions, many of which are crisp and easily legible due to varying degrees of preservation. (Submitted on December 23, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. Antiquities Act of 1906 (Wikipedia). This law gives the President of the United States the authority to, by presidential proclamation, create national monuments from federal lands to protect significant natural, cultural, or scientific features. The Act has been used more than a hundred times since its passage. (Submitted on December 23, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 24, 2020. It was originally submitted on December 23, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 47 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 23, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   3. submitted on December 24, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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Mar. 3, 2021